1.(MC)Read these lines from Macbeth:The west yet glimmers with some streaks of day: Now spurs the lated traveller apace, To gain the timely inn; and near approaches The subject of our watch.Which of the following is true of the words lated traveller as used here? (5 points)Lated is likely a Shakespearian version of belated.Lated is meant to suggest the travelers are important.Lated, like knighted, is something bestowed.Lated suggests the travelers themselves are not at fault.2.(MC)Read this line from Frankenstein by Mary Shelley:Sometimes my pulse beat so quickly and hardly that I felt the palpitation of every artery; at others, I nearly sank to the ground through languor and extreme weakness.Which definition of hardly is most likely suited for this line? (5 points)Early 16th Century: With trouble or hardshipMiddle English—Early 19th Century: With energy or forceMiddle 16th Century: Barely, only just; not quiteMiddle 16th Century: Not easily3.(MC)Read this line from Frankenstein by Mary Shelley:I had gazed on him while unfinished; he was ugly then, but when those muscles and joints were rendered capable of motion, it became a thing such as even Dante could not have conceived.Which definition of render is most likely suited for this line? (5 points)14th Century: delivered15th Century: returned16th Century: depicted20th Century: made4.(LC)Which sentence uses syntax for emphasis? (5 points)Ask not what your country can do for you… John F. KennedyIt is easier to do a job right than to explain why you didn’t.—Martin Van BurenThe price of freedom is eternal vigilance…Thomas JeffersonThe brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it… Abraham Lincoln5.(LC)Which synonym describes something horrible in the worst possible terms? (5 points)Awful: extremely objectionableDisagreeable: unpleasant or offensiveGross: inspiring disgust or distasteOdious: hateful or revolting6.(LC)Read this line from Frankenstein by Mary Shelley:The porter opened the gates of the court, which had that night been my asylum, and I issued into the streets, pacing them with quick steps, as if I sought to avoid the wretch whom I feared every turning of the street would present to my view.Considering the use of the phrase “Opened the gates,” what is the most likely meaning of the word asylum in this line? (5 points)ProtectionDistressCrimeDecision7.(MC)Frankenstein Chapter 2, Excerpt By Mary ShelleyVictor Frankenstein recounts the influences that lead to his great experiment:When I was thirteen years of age we all went on a party of pleasure to the baths near Thonon; the inclemency of the weather obliged us to remain a day confined to the inn. In this house I chanced to find a volume of the works of Cornelius Agrippa. I opened it with apathy; the theory which he attempts to demonstrate and the wonderful facts which he relates soon changed this feeling into enthusiasm. A new light seemed to dawn upon my mind, and bounding with joy, I communicated my discovery to my father. My father looked carelessly at the title page of my book and said, “Ah! Cornelius Agrippa! My dear Victor, do not waste your time upon this; it is sad trash.”If, instead of this remark, my father had taken the pains to explain to me that the principles of Agrippa had been entirely exploded and that a modern system of science had been introduced which possessed much greater powers than the ancient, because the powers of the latter were chimerical, while those of the former were real and practical, under such circumstances I should certainly have thrown Agrippa aside and have contented my imagination, warmed as it was, by returning with greater ardour to my former studies. It is even possible that the train of my ideas would never have received the fatal impulse that led to my ruin. But the cursory glance my father had taken of my volume by no means assured me that he was acquainted with its contents, and I continued to read with the greatest avidity. When I returned home my first care was to procure the whole works of this author, and afterwards of Paracelsus and Albertus Magnus. I read and studied the wild fancies of these writers with delight; they appeared to me treasures known to few besides myself. I have described myself as always having been imbued with a fervent longing to penetrate the secrets of nature. In spite of the intense labour and wonderful discoveries of modern philosophers, I always came from my studies discontented and unsatisfied. Sir Isaac Newton is said to have avowed that he felt like a child picking up shells beside the great and unexplored ocean of truth. Those of his successors in each branch of natural philosophy with whom I was acquainted appeared even to my boy’s apprehensions as tyros engaged in the same pursuit.Under the guidance of my new preceptors I entered with the greatest diligence into the search of the philosopher’s stone and the elixir of life; but the latter soon obtained my undivided attention. Wealth was an inferior object, but what glory would attend the discovery if I could banish disease from the human frame and render man invulnerable to any but a violent death!Which line from the text most clearly indicates the narrator wants to be seen as a victim of circumstance? (5 points)In this house I chanced to find a volume of the works of Cornelius Agrippa. I opened it with apathy;A new light seemed to dawn upon my mind, and bounding with joy, I communicated my discovery to my father.My father looked carelessly at the title page of my book and said, “Ah! Cornelius Agrippa! My dear Victor, do not waste your time upon this; it is sad trash.”It is even possible that the train of my ideas would never have received the fatal impulse that led to my ruin.8.(LC)Frankenstein Chapter 2, Excerpt By Mary ShelleyVictor Frankenstein recounts the influences that lead to his great experiment:When I was thirteen years of age we all went on a party of pleasure to the baths near Thonon; the inclemency of the weather obliged us to remain a day confined to the inn. In this house I chanced to find a volume of the works of Cornelius Agrippa. I opened it with apathy; the theory which he attempts to demonstrate and the wonderful facts which he relates soon changed this feeling into enthusiasm. A new light seemed to dawn upon my mind, and bounding with joy, I communicated my discovery to my father. My father looked carelessly at the title page of my book and said, “Ah! Cornelius Agrippa! My dear Victor, do not waste your time upon this; it is sad trash.”If, instead of this remark, my father had taken the pains to explain to me that the principles of Agrippa had been entirely exploded and that a modern system of science had been introduced which possessed much greater powers than the ancient, because the powers of the latter were chimerical, while those of the former were real and practical, under such circumstances I should certainly have thrown Agrippa aside and have contented my imagination, warmed as it was, by returning with greater ardour to my former studies. It is even possible that the train of my ideas would never have received the fatal impulse that led to my ruin. But the cursory glance my father had taken of my volume by no means assured me that he was acquainted with its contents, and I continued to read with the greatest avidity.Read this excerpt from the text:It is even possible that the train of my ideas would never have received the fatal impulse that led to my ruin.What does the author mean by the “fatal impulse” he describes in this line? (5 points)Something happened that set terrible things in motion.Someone checked his medical history and found bad news.Somewhere in his youth he had a near-death experience.Sometime in the future he plans to become famous.9.(LC)Frankenstein Chapter 2, Excerpt By Mary ShelleyVictor Frankenstein recounts the influences that lead to his great experiment:When I was thirteen years of age we all went on a party of pleasure to the baths near Thonon; the inclemency of the weather obliged us to remain a day confined to the inn. In this house I chanced to find a volume of the works of Cornelius Agrippa. I opened it with apathy; the theory which he attempts to demonstrate and the wonderful facts which he relates soon changed this feeling into enthusiasm. A new light seemed to dawn upon my mind, and bounding with joy, I communicated my discovery to my father. My father looked carelessly at the title page of my book and said, “Ah! Cornelius Agrippa! My dear Victor, do not waste your time upon this; it is sad trash.”If, instead of this remark, my father had taken the pains to explain to me that the principles of Agrippa had been entirely exploded and that a modern system of science had been introduced which possessed much greater powers than the ancient, because the powers of the latter were chimerical, while those of the former were real and practical, under such circumstances I should certainly have thrown Agrippa aside and have contented my imagination, warmed as it was, by returning with greater ardour to my former studies. It is even possible that the train of my ideas would never have received the fatal impulse that led to my ruin. But the cursory glance my father had taken of my volume by no means assured me that he was acquainted with its contents, and I continued to read with the greatest avidity. When I returned home my first care was to procure the whole works of this author, and afterwards of Paracelsus and Albertus Magnus. I read and studied the wild fancies of these writers with delight; they appeared to me treasures known to few besides myself. I have described myself as always having been imbued with a fervent longing to penetrate the secrets of nature. In spite of the intense labour and wonderful discoveries of modern philosophers, I always came from my studies discontented and unsatisfied. Sir Isaac Newton is said to have avowed that he felt like a child picking up shells beside the great and unexplored ocean of truth. Those of his successors in each branch of natural philosophy with whom I was acquainted appeared even to my boy’s apprehensions as tyros engaged in the same pursuit.Under the guidance of my new preceptors I entered with the greatest diligence into the search of the philosopher’s stone and the elixir of life; but the latter soon obtained my undivided attention. Wealth was an inferior object, but what glory would attend the discovery if I could banish disease from the human frame and render man invulnerable to any but a violent death!Read this line from the text:I have described myself as always having been imbued with a fervent longing to penetrate the secrets of nature.In this line, the author is exploring man versus nature. Which word from this passage best demonstrates the conflict between man and nature? (5 points)DescribedMyselfPenetrateSecrets10.(MC)Frankenstein Chapter 2, Excerpt By Mary ShelleyVictor Frankenstein recounts the influences that lead to his great experiment:When I was thirteen years of age we all went on a party of pleasure to the baths near Thonon; the inclemency of the weather obliged us to remain a day confined to the inn. In this house I chanced to find a volume of the works of Cornelius Agrippa. I opened it with apathy; the theory which he attempts to demonstrate and the wonderful facts which he relates soon changed this feeling into enthusiasm. A new light seemed to dawn upon my mind, and bounding with joy, I communicated my discovery to my father. My father looked carelessly at the title page of my book and said, “Ah! Cornelius Agrippa! My dear Victor, do not waste your time upon this; it is sad trash.”If, instead of this remark, my father had taken the pains to explain to me that the principles of Agrippa had been entirely exploded and that a modern system of science had been introduced which possessed much greater powers than the ancient, because the powers of the latter were chimerical, while those of the former were real and practical, under such circumstances I should certainly have thrown Agrippa aside and have contented my imagination, warmed as it was, by returning with greater ardour to my former studies. It is even possible that the train of my ideas would never have received the fatal impulse that led to my ruin. But the cursory glance my father had taken of my volume by no means assured me that he was acquainted with its contents, and I continued to read with the greatest avidity. When I returned home my first care was to procure the whole works of this author, and afterwards of Paracelsus and Albertus Magnus. I read and studied the wild fancies of these writers with delight; they appeared to me treasures known to few besides myself. I have described myself as always having been imbued with a fervent longing to penetrate the secrets of nature. In spite of the intense labour and wonderful discoveries of modern philosophers, I always came from my studies discontented and unsatisfied. Sir Isaac Newton is said to have avowed that he felt like a child picking up shells beside the great and unexplored ocean of truth. Those of his successors in each branch of natural philosophy with whom I was acquainted appeared even to my boy’s apprehensions as tyros engaged in the same pursuit.Under the guidance of my new preceptors I entered with the greatest diligence into the search of the philosopher’s stone and the elixir of life; but the latter soon obtained my undivided attention. Wealth was an inferior object, but what glory would attend the discovery if I could banish disease from the human frame and render man invulnerable to any but a violent death!Which lines from the text most clearly suggest the narrator is ambitious? (5 points)When I was thirteen years of age we all went on a party of pleasure to the baths near Thonon; the inclemency of the weather obliged us to remain a day confined to the inn.I read and studied the wild fancies of these writers with delight; they appeared to me treasures known to few besides myself.I have described myself as always having been imbued with a fervent longing to penetrate the secrets of nature.Wealth was an inferior object, but what glory would attend the discovery if I could banish disease from the human frame and render man invulnerable to any but a violent death!11.(MC)Frankenstein Chapter 2, Excerpt 2 By Mary ShelleyVictor Frankenstein continues recounting the influences that lead to his great experiment:An accident again changed the current of my ideas. When I was about fifteen years old we had retired to our house near Belrive, when we witnessed a most violent and terrible thunderstorm. It advanced from behind the mountains of Jura, and the thunder burst at once with frightful loudness from various quarters of the heavens. I remained, while the storm lasted, watching its progress with curiosity and delight. As I stood at the door, on a sudden I beheld a stream of fire issue from an old and beautiful oak which stood about twenty yards from our house; and so soon as the dazzling light vanished, the oak had disappeared, and nothing remained but a blasted stump. When we visited it the next morning, we found the tree shattered in a singular manner. It was not splintered by the shock, but entirely reduced to thin ribbons of wood. I never beheld anything so utterly destroyed.Before this I was not unacquainted with the more obvious laws of electricity. On this occasion a man of great research in natural philosophy was with us, and excited by this catastrophe, he entered on the explanation of a theory which he had formed on the subject of electricity and galvanism, which was at once new and astonishing to me. All that he said threw greatly into the shade Cornelius Agrippa, Albertus Magnus, and Paracelsus, the lords of my imagination; but by some fatality the overthrow of these men disinclined me to pursue my accustomed studies. It seemed to me as if nothing would or could ever be known. All that had so long engaged my attention suddenly grew despicable. By one of those caprices of the mind which we are perhaps most subject to in early youth, I at once gave up my former occupations, set down natural history and all its progeny as a deformed and abortive creation, and entertained the greatest disdain for a would-be science which could never even step within the threshold of real knowledge. In this mood of mind I betook myself to the mathematics and the branches of study appertaining to that science as being built upon secure foundations, and so worthy of my consideration.This passage demonstrates use of a first person narrator, where the character tells the story. Why did the author use this writing style? (5 points)It allows readers to focus on events rather than characters or personalities.It allows readers to understand the character’s personality while learning about events.It allows readers to identify easily with anyone who opposes the narrator.It allows readers to understand the secret feelings of other characters the narrator meets.12.(MC)Frankenstein Chapter 2, Excerpt 2 By Mary ShelleyVictor Frankenstein continues recounting the influences that lead to his great experiment:An accident again changed the current of my ideas. When I was about fifteen years old we had retired to our house near Belrive, when we witnessed a most violent and terrible thunderstorm. It advanced from behind the mountains of Jura, and the thunder burst at once with frightful loudness from various quarters of the heavens. I remained, while the storm lasted, watching its progress with curiosity and delight. As I stood at the door, on a sudden I beheld a stream of fire issue from an old and beautiful oak which stood about twenty yards from our house; and so soon as the dazzling light vanished, the oak had disappeared, and nothing remained but a blasted stump. When we visited it the next morning, we found the tree shattered in a singular manner. It was not splintered by the shock, but entirely reduced to thin ribbons of wood. I never beheld anything so utterly destroyed.Before this I was not unacquainted with the more obvious laws of electricity. On this occasion a man of great research in natural philosophy was with us, and excited by this catastrophe, he entered on the explanation of a theory which he had formed on the subject of electricity and galvanism, which was at once new and astonishing to me. All that he said threw greatly into the shade Cornelius Agrippa, Albertus Magnus, and Paracelsus, the lords of my imagination; but by some fatality the overthrow of these men disinclined me to pursue my accustomed studies. It seemed to me as if nothing would or could ever be known. All that had so long engaged my attention suddenly grew despicable. By one of those caprices of the mind which we are perhaps most subject to in early youth, I at once gave up my former occupations, set down natural history and all its progeny as a deformed and abortive creation, and entertained the greatest disdain for a would-be science which could never even step within the threshold of real knowledge. In this mood of mind I betook myself to the mathematics and the branches of study appertaining to that science as being built upon secure foundations, and so worthy of my consideration.What is the main effect of describing key events in the narrative as “accidents” or as happening by chance? (5 points)They suggest the events are not entirely negative in their effects on the narrator.They suggest the events cannot be retold objectively by the narrator.They suggest the narrator feels a great sense of responsibility for the events.They suggest the narrator is not fully responsible for the outcome of his story.13.(LC)Frankenstein Chapter 2, Excerpt 2 By Mary ShelleyVictor Frankenstein continues recounting the influences that lead to his great experiment:Before this I was not unacquainted with the more obvious laws of electricity. On this occasion a man of great research in natural philosophy was with us, and excited by this catastrophe, he entered on the explanation of a theory which he had formed on the subject of electricity and galvanism, which was at once new and astonishing to me. All that he said threw greatly into the shade Cornelius Agrippa, Albertus Magnus, and Paracelsus, the lords of my imagination; but by some fatality the overthrow of these men disinclined me to pursue my accustomed studies. It seemed to me as if nothing would or could ever be known. All that had so long engaged my attention suddenly grew despicable. By one of those caprices of the mind which we are perhaps most subject to in early youth, I at once gave up my former occupations, set down natural history and all its progeny as a deformed and abortive creation, and entertained the greatest disdain for a would-be science which could never even step within the threshold of real knowledge. In this mood of mind I betook myself to the mathematics and the branches of study appertaining to that science as being built upon secure foundations, and so worthy of my consideration.Read this sentence from the text:It seemed to me as if nothing would or could ever be known. All that had so long engaged my attention suddenly grew despicable.What change has the character experienced. (5 points)He no longer enjoys his work.He gained a new appreciation for his work.He has become closer with his friends.He has taught something to his friends.14.(LC)Frankenstein Chapter 2, Excerpt 2 By Mary ShelleyVictor Frankenstein continues recounting the influences that lead to his great experiment:Before this I was not unacquainted with the more obvious laws of electricity. On this occasion a man of great research in natural philosophy was with us, and excited by this catastrophe, he entered on the explanation of a theory which he had formed on the subject of electricity and galvanism, which was at once new and astonishing to me. All that he said threw greatly into the shade Cornelius Agrippa, Albertus Magnus, and Paracelsus, the lords of my imagination; but by some fatality the overthrow of these men disinclined me to pursue my accustomed studies. It seemed to me as if nothing would or could ever be known. All that had so long engaged my attention suddenly grew despicable. By one of those caprices of the mind which we are perhaps most subject to in early youth, I at once gave up my former occupations, set down natural history and all its progeny as a deformed and abortive creation, and entertained the greatest disdain for a would-be science which could never even step within the threshold of real knowledge. In this mood of mind I betook myself to the mathematics and the branches of study appertaining to that science as being built upon secure foundations, and so worthy of my consideration.Which line from the text states that the narrator was young at the time? (5 points)By one of those caprices of the mind which we are perhaps most subject to in early youth…I at once gave up my former occupations, set down natural history and all its progeny as a deformed and abortive creation…In this mood of mind I betook myself to the mathematics……the branches of study appertaining to that science as being built upon secure foundations, and so worthy of my consideration.15.(MC)Read this line from Frankenstein:But the cursory glance my father had taken of my volume by no means assured me that he was acquainted with its contents…Based on the context, which of the following best explains the word cursory? (5 points)Not complete or sufficient to understanding fullyNot demonstrating favor appropriate for royalty or wealthNot loud enough or forceful enough to register effectNot including enough people to participate properly16.(LC)Read this line from Frankenstein:And thus for a time I was occupied by exploded systems, mingling, like an unadept, a thousand contradictory theories and floundering desperately in a very slough of multifarious knowledge, guided by an ardent imagination and childish reasoning…An adept is one who is an expert at something.Why does the author use the word unadept in this line? (5 points)To show frustrationTo show confidenceTo show fearTo show expertise17.(LC)Frankenstein Chapter 2, Excerpt 2 By Mary ShelleyVictor Frankenstein continues recounting the influences that lead to his great experiment:An accident again changed the current of my ideas. When I was about fifteen years old we had retired to our house near Belrive, when we witnessed a most violent and terrible thunderstorm. It advanced from behind the mountains of Jura, and the thunder burst at once with frightful loudness from various quarters of the heavens. I remained, while the storm lasted, watching its progress with curiosity and delight. As I stood at the door, on a sudden I beheld a stream of fire issue from an old and beautiful oak which stood about twenty yards from our house; and so soon as the dazzling light vanished, the oak had disappeared, and nothing remained but a blasted stump. When we visited it the next morning, we found the tree shattered in a singular manner. It was not splintered by the shock, but entirely reduced to thin ribbons of wood. I never beheld anything so utterly destroyed.Which character has the author decided to focus on for the telling of this story? (5 points)The stormBelriveVictorThe house18.(LC)Frankenstein Chapter 2, Excerpt 2 By Mary ShelleyVictor Frankenstein continues recounting the influences that lead to his great experiment:An accident again changed the current of my ideas. When I was about fifteen years old we had retired to our house near Belrive, when we witnessed a most violent and terrible thunderstorm. It advanced from behind the mountains of Jura, and the thunder burst at once with frightful loudness from various quarters of the heavens. I remained, while the storm lasted, watching its progress with curiosity and delight. As I stood at the door, on a sudden I beheld a stream of fire issue from an old and beautiful oak which stood about twenty yards from our house; and so soon as the dazzling light vanished, the oak had disappeared, and nothing remained but a blasted stump. When we visited it the next morning, we found the tree shattered in a singular manner. It was not splintered by the shock, but entirely reduced to thin ribbons of wood. I never beheld anything so utterly destroyed.What would have to change for there to be dialogue in this passage? (5 points)Fewer characters would have to appear.The passage would have to be shorter.More characters would have to appear.The passage would have to be scarier.19.(MC)Frankenstein Chapter 2, Excerpt 2 By Mary ShelleyVictor Frankenstein continues recounting the influences that lead to his great experiment:An accident again changed the current of my ideas. When I was about fifteen years old we had retired to our house near Belrive, when we witnessed a most violent and terrible thunderstorm. It advanced from behind the mountains of Jura, and the thunder burst at once with frightful loudness from various quarters of the heavens. I remained, while the storm lasted, watching its progress with curiosity and delight. As I stood at the door, on a sudden I beheld a stream of fire issue from an old and beautiful oak which stood about twenty yards from our house; and so soon as the dazzling light vanished, the oak had disappeared, and nothing remained but a blasted stump. When we visited it the next morning, we found the tree shattered in a singular manner. It was not splintered by the shock, but entirely reduced to thin ribbons of wood. I never beheld anything so utterly destroyed.Before this I was not unacquainted with the more obvious laws of electricity. On this occasion a man of great research in natural philosophy was with us, and excited by this catastrophe, he entered on the explanation of a theory which he had formed on the subject of electricity and galvanism, which was at once new and astonishing to me. All that he said threw greatly into the shade Cornelius Agrippa, Albertus Magnus, and Paracelsus, the lords of my imagination; but by some fatality the overthrow of these men disinclined me to pursue my accustomed studies. It seemed to me as if nothing would or could ever be known. All that had so long engaged my attention suddenly grew despicable. By one of those caprices of the mind which we are perhaps most subject to in early youth, I at once gave up my former occupations, set down natural history and all its progeny as a deformed and abortive creation, and entertained the greatest disdain for a would-be science which could never even step within the threshold of real knowledge. In this mood of mind I betook myself to the mathematics and the branches of study appertaining to that science as being built upon secure foundations, and so worthy of my consideration.Which of the following topics could be used to write a narrative using supporting details from this excerpt? (5 points)Alienation from his father is exactly what Victor deserves.The new scientist becomes a mentor to Victor as he studies electricity.Victor is uncertain about what he should do.Victor presents himself as a deity.20.(MC)Read Article IX of the United States Bill of Rights:The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.What does the word construed suggest the author feels about the Constitution? (5 points)The Constitution has more value than the rights of the individual people it governs.The Constitution is an infallible document, regardless of interpretations.The Constitution may be interpreted in a variety of ways to benefit the people.The Constitution may be interpreted in a way that would harm the people.