Please use CoreLogic as the company for the Assignment 1… The focus would be the Property Tax Estimator. If the book Framework for Marketing is available please use that as well. As the book will be needed in order to answer the below question as well. Part 2 Discussion Question:Then discuss how you will segment the market for your chosen company’s marketing plan, using Kotler and Keller’s basis for market segmentation in Table 6.1 (geographic, demographic, psychographic and behavioral) or Business-to-Business (B2B) market segmentation (demographic, operating variables, purchasing approaches, situational factors, and personal characteristics) in Table 6.2.Identify and describe clearly your biggest challenge Make reference to Table 6.1 (Major Segmentation Variables for Consumer Markets) or Table 6.2 (Major Segmentation Variables for Business Markets)Respond to two of your peers with an idea to overcome their challenge
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JWI 518: Marketing In a Global Environment
Academic Submissions and Evaluations
Assignment 1: Executive Memo
Due Week 3, Sunday midnight of your time zone (Weight: 10%)
“If you don’t have a competitive advantage, don’t compete.”
– Jack Welch
Overview
Marketing plays an important role in the growth of an organization and its ability to create and sustain a
competitive advantage. Unfortunately, some organizations undertake marketing initiatives without a clear
idea of what they want to achieve, how their offerings stack up to those of their competitors, and how they
will measure success.
For this assignment, you will assume the role of a leader of a business unit or product group. You believe
there is significant untapped market potential for the products or services you manage and you want to
approach a “senior decision maker” for support. This could be the Chief Marketing Officer of the
organization or it could be a venture capital firm or bank from which you are seeing funding. Knowing that
your audience is busy, and is regularly being approach by other leaders and managers seeking support for
their ideas, you recognize you will need a strong and compelling pitch.
You decide to draft a brief Executive Memo outlining your ideas for marketing. Your memo will need to
strike the right balance of being short and focused, but also providing enough detail to demonstrate that you
know what you’re talking about. You recognize that simply saying you “want to increase sales by 15% next
quarter” isn’t what this is about. Your objective in this initial outreach is to identify general marketing goals
the company should be focusing on and to get the support you need.
Leveraging what you have been learning in the first three weeks of your JWI-518 Marketing in a Global
Environment course at JWMI (including the first three chapters of the textbook, course lecture notes and
external resources including, but not limited to, the company website), you decide to organize your memo
into three parts:
1. Marketing Goals
2. Marketing Research
3. Marketing Metrics
Instructions
1. The focus of your Executive Memo is the company-organization and product or service you chose
at the beginning of the course, and which we be used for your Marketing Plan Project. This could be
the company you currently work for, a start-up, a Fortune 500 company, or a non-profit
organization.
© Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University confidential and proprietary information and may not be
copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University. This course
guide is subject to change based on the needs of the class.
JWI 518 – Assignment 1 (1186)
Page 1 of 5
JWI 518: Marketing In a Global Environment
Academic Submissions and Evaluations
2. Organize your memo as follows:
o
Identify 3 to 5 Marketing Goals you want to focus on. As a reminder, these goals could
include:
§ Build awareness of the company/brand
§ Increase market share
§ Capture a new target market
§ Increase sales, revenues, profits
§ Increase new accounts or relationships
§ Increased share of customer’s business
§ Increased return on investment (ROI)
§ Converting sales leads into customers
o
Explain why you have identified these particular goals as being most important
3. Leveraging Kotler & Keller’s 6-step marketing research process from Chapter 3 of A Framework for
Marketing Management, present your rationale for the type of Market Research needed to support
your initiative. Specifically, address which of the following are the most critical things you need to
uncover. This could include:
a. Determine the feasibility of a new business or product or service. Market research is
an essential component of a business plan for startup businesses – if market research does
not indicate a demand for the product or service the proposed business will not likely be
viable.
b. Test interest in new products or services to respond to customer needs.
c.
Find and develop new markets.
d. Monitor industry and economic trends and develop strategies to adapt the business to
the changing environment.
e. Determine optimal product placement – when, where, and how should a product or
service be distributed.
f.
Improve aspects of their businesses, such as customer service. Develop competitive
strategies – for example, setting competitive pricing for products or services or determining
how your products/services and customer service compare to the competition.
© Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University confidential and proprietary information and may not be
copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University. This course
guide is subject to change based on the needs of the class.
JWI 518 – Assignment 1 (1186)
Page 2 of 5
JWI 518: Marketing In a Global Environment
Academic Submissions and Evaluations
4. Explain how the success of your proposed marketing initiative will be measured. In other words,
which Marketing Metrics are most important to track? Use Kotler & Keller’s Marketing Metrics from
Chapter 2, Table 2.2 (shown below) to guide you. Remember, the marketing metrics should exactly
match your marketing goals.
Sales Metrics



Sales growth
Market share
Sales from
new products
Customer
Readiness to Buy

Awareness

Preference

Purchase
intention
Customer Metrics



Reduction in
customer
complaints
Reduction in
customer
losses
Increase in
new
customer
gains



Distribution
Metrics
Number of
locations
Out of stock
frequency
Share in
stores
handling
Communication
Metrics

Top-of-mind
brand
awareness

Survey
response rate

Number of
media stories
Professional Formatting Requirements

Typed, double-spaced, professional font (size 10-12), including bolded headings and subheadings,
with one-inch margins on all sides.

References must be included and provide appropriate information that enables the reader to locate
the original source. Application and analysis of course materials and resources are expected, and
additional research is welcome.

Include a cover page containing the title of the assignment, your name, your professor’s name, the
course title, and the date.

Your memo should be no more than four (4) pages in length, excluding your cover page and
references list.
© Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University confidential and proprietary information and may not be
copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University. This course
guide is subject to change based on the needs of the class.
JWI 518 – Assignment 1 (1186)
Page 3 of 5
JWI 518: Marketing In a Global Environment
Academic Submissions and Evaluations
Weight: 10%
Assignment 1: Executive Memo
Criteria
Unsatisfactory
1. Analyzes
and presents
the company’s
marketing
goals,
Does not or
unsatisfactorily
analyzes the
company’s
marketing goals.
Weight: 25%
2. Discusses
the company’s
use of the
Kotler & Keller
6-step
Marketing
Research
process.
Weight: 25%
Little to no
synthesis of
ideas is
demonstrated,
and logical
reasoning is not
included or
evident.
Did not or
unsatisfactorily
discuss the
company’s use of
the Kotler &
Keller 6-step
marketing
research
process.
Little to no
synthesis of
ideas is
demonstrated,
and logical
reasoning is not
included or
evident.
3. Discusses
and identifies
the company’s
marketing
metrics.
Did not or
unsatisfactorily
discusses and
identifies the
company’s
marketing
metrics.
Weight: 25%
Little to no
synthesis of
ideas is
demonstrated,
and logical
reasoning is not
evident.
Low Pass
Pass
High Pass
Satisfactorily
analyzes the
company’s
marketing goals.
Completely
analyzes the
company’s
marketing goals.
Exemplarily
analyzes the
company’s
marketing goals,
Demonstrates
synthesis of
ideas and logical
reasoning from
course concepts.
Demonstrates
thorough
synthesis of
ideas and
understanding of
course concepts.
Demonstrates
critical analysis,
an excellent
synthesis of
ideas, and deep
understanding of
course concepts
and unique
insights.
Partially
discusses the
company’s use of
the Kotler &
Keller 6-step
marketing
research
process.
Satisfactorily
discusses the
company’s use of
the Kotler &
Keller 6-step
marketing
research
process.
Completely
discusses the
company’s use of
the Kotler &
Keller 6-step
marketing
research
process.
Exemplarily
discusses the
company’s use of
the Kotler &
Keller 6-step
marketing
research
process.
Demonstrates
some synthesis
of ideas and
understanding of
course concepts.
Demonstrates
synthesis of
ideas and
understanding of
course concepts.
Demonstrates
thorough
synthesis of
ideas and
understanding of
course concepts.
Demonstrates
critical analysis,
an excellent
synthesis of
ideas, and deep
understanding of
course concepts
and unique
insights.
Partially
discusses and
identifies the
company’s
marketing
metrics.
Satisfactorily
discusses and
identifies the
company’s
marketing
metrics.
Completely
discusses and
identifies the
company’s
marketing
metrics.
Exemplarily
discusses and
identifies the
company’s
marketing
metrics.
Demonstrates
some synthesis
of ideas and
understanding of
course concepts.
Demonstrates
synthesis of
ideas and
understanding of
course concepts.
Demonstrates
thorough
synthesis of
ideas and
understanding of
course concepts.
Demonstrates
critical analysis,
excellent
synthesis of
ideas, deep
understanding of
course concepts
& unique insights.
Partially analyzes
the company’s
marketing goals.
Demonstrates
some synthesis
of ideas and
understanding of
course concepts.
Honors
© Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University confidential and proprietary information and may not be
copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University. This course
guide is subject to change based on the needs of the class.
JWI 518 – Assignment 1 (1186)
Page 4 of 5
JWI 518: Marketing In a Global Environment
Academic Submissions and Evaluations
4. Rationale,
support, and
thought
leadership
Weight: 15%
5. The
Executive
Memo is
professionally
formatted and
includes in-text
citations,
references,
and is free
from grammar
and spelling
errors.
Weight: 10%
The rationale is
not supported
with references to
course reading
materials and
external sources
as appropriate.
The rationale is
partially
supported with
references to
course reading
materials and
external sources
as appropriate.
The rationale is
mostly supported
by references to
course reading
materials and
external sources
as appropriate.
The rationale is
completely
supported with
course reading
materials and
external sources
as appropriate.
The rationale
demonstrates
student’s thought
leadership and is
well supported
with course
reading materials
and external
sources as
appropriate.
The Executive
Memo is
unsatisfactorily
formatted. It may
not include a
cover page and
headings or lacks
professional
choices in
formatting, font,
and spacing.
The Executive
Memo is partially
satisfactorily
formatted. It may
not include a
cover page and
headings or lacks
professional
choices in
formatting, font,
and spacing.
The Executive
Memo is
professionally
formatted.
The Executive
Memo is
exceptionally
formatted. It is
highly
professional in
look and easy to
quickly locate
information.
Sources are not
consistently cited
in text, and
references are
not included in a
manner that
enables the
reader to quickly
identify sources.
Sources may are
not consistently
cited in text, and
references may
not be included in
a manner that
enables the
reader to quickly
identify sources.
The Executive
Memo is
satisfactorily
formatted. It
includes a cover
page and
headings but
may lack
professional
choices in
formatting, font,
and spacing.
There are
numerous
grammatical or
usage errors.
Some
grammatical or
usage errors.
Sources may not
be consistently
cited in text, and
references may
not be included in
a manner that
enables the
reader to quickly
identify sources.
Some
grammatical or
usage errors.
It includes a
cover page,
headings,
professional
formatting, font,
and spacing.
All sources are
consistently cited
in text, and
references are
included in a
manner that
enables the
reader to quickly
identify sources.
No grammatical
or usage errors.
It includes a
cover page,
headings,
professional
formatting, font,
and spacing.
Sources are
consistently cited
in text, and
references are
included in a
manner that
enables the
reader to quickly
identify sources.
No mechanics or
usage errors.
© Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University confidential and proprietary information and may not be
copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University. This course
guide is subject to change based on the needs of the class.
JWI 518 – Assignment 1 (1186)
Page 5 of 5
Chapter 3
Capturing Marketing
Insights and Forecasting
Demand
In this chapter, we will address the following questions:
1. What are the components of a modern marketing information system? (Page 35)
2. How can companies collect marketing intelligence? (Page 36)
3. What constitutes good marketing research? (Page 37)
4. How can companies accurately measure and forecast market demand? (Page 42)
5. What are some influential developments in the macroenvironment? (Page 45)
Marketing Management at Campbell Soup Company
The Campbell Soup Company’s iconic red-and-white soup can represents one of the most famous U.S.
brands. Recently, though, overall consumption of canned soup has declined 13 percent, and the firm’s
market share has dropped from 67 percent to 53 percent. To help stop the sales slide, Campbell’s set out
to better understand the habits and tastes of 18- to 34-year-olds. Executives visited “hipster market
hubs” to observe Millennials during “live-alongs,” where they shopped and ate at home with young
consumers, and “eat-alongs,” where they dined with them in restaurants. The key insight: Millennials
love spices and eat more exotic food than their parents—they just can’t cook it at home! The solution: a
new line of Campbell’s Go! Soup—ready-to-eat, boldly-flavored meals sold in pouches (and at a price
more than three times the basic red-and-white line). Since the target market is tech-savvy, the product
line was promoted entirely online on music and humor sites, gaming platforms, and social media.1
V
irtually every industry has been touched by dramatic shifts in the economic, sociocultural,
natural, technological, demographic, and political-legal environments. In this chapter, we
34
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Chapter 3   Capturing Marketing Insights and Forecasting Demand
35
consider how Campbell’s and other firms can collect and store information, conduct marketing
research, develop good forecasts to support marketing management, and analyze trends in the
macroenvironment.
The Marketing Information System and Marketing Intelligence
The major responsibility for identifying significant marketplace changes falls to the company’s
marketers. Marketers have two advantages for the task: disciplined methods for collecting information and time spent interacting with customers and observing competitors and other outside
groups. Some firms have marketing information systems that provide rich detail about buyer
wants, preferences, and behavior.
Every firm must organize and distribute a continuous flow of information to its marketing
managers. A marketing information system (MIS) consists of people, equipment, and procedures to gather, sort, analyze, evaluate, and distribute needed, timely, and accurate information to
marketing decision makers. It relies on internal company records, marketing intelligence activities, and marketing research.
Internal Records and Database Systems
To spot important opportunities and potential problems, marketing managers rely on internal
reports of orders, sales, prices, costs, inventory levels, receivables, and payables.
The Order-to-Payment Cycle   The heart of the internal records system is the order-to-payment
cycle. Sales representatives, dealers, and customers send orders to the firm. The sales department
prepares invoices, transmits copies to various departments, and back-orders out-of-stock items.
Shipped items generate shipping and billing documents. Because customers favor firms that can
promise timely delivery, companies need to perform these steps quickly and accurately.
Sales Information Systems   Marketing managers need timely and accurate reports on current sales. Walmart operates a sales and inventory data warehouse that captures data on every item
for every customer, every store, every day and refreshes it every hour. Marketers must carefully
interpret sales data, however, to avoid drawing wrong conclusions.
Databases, Data Warehousing, and Data Mining   A customer database is an organized
collection of comprehensive information about individual customers or prospects that is current,
accessible, and actionable for lead generation, lead qualification, sales, or customer relationship
management. Database marketing is the process of building, maintaining, and using customer
databases and other databases (products, suppliers, resellers) to contact, transact with, and build
relationships with customers. Information captured by the company is organized into a data
warehouse where marketers can capture, query, and analyze data to draw inferences about individual customers’ needs and responses. Marketing analysts use data mining to extract from the
mass of data useful insights about customer behavior, trends, and segments.
The explosion of data brought by the maturation of the Internet and mobile technology
gives companies unprecedented opportunities to engage customers. It also threatens to overwhelm decision makers. “Marketing Insight: Digging into Big Data” describes opportunities and
challenges in managing massive data sets.2 On the other hand, some customers may not want a
relationship with the company and may resent having personal data collected and stored. The
use of behavioral targeting to track customers’ online behavior for marketing purposes allows
advertisers to better target online ads—but some consumers object to the practice. Chapter 17
discusses database marketing in the context of direct marketing.
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36
Part 1   Understanding Marketing Management
marketing
insight
Digging into Big Data
I
n one year, people store enough data to fill
60,000 Libraries of Congress. YouTube receives
24 hours of video every minute. Manufacturers
are putting sensors and chips into appliances and
products, generating even more data. However,
more data are not better unless they can be properly processed, analyzed, and interpreted. And
therein lies the opportunity and challenge of Big
Data, data sets that cannot be effectively managed
with traditional tools.
One industry expert, James Kobielus, sees
Big Data as distinctive because of: Volume (from
hundreds of terabytes to petabytes and beyond);
Velocity (up to and including real-time delivery);
Variety (encompassing structured, unstructured,
and semi-structured formats such as messages, images, and GPS signals); and Volatility (with hundreds
of new data sources in apps, Web services, and social
networks).
Some companies are harnessing Big Data.
UK supermarket giant Tesco uses the 1.5 billion
pieces of data it collect …
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