As a marketing consultant, you will need to advise clients on the development of a communication strategy that has contingencies to address situations such as the one presented in the scenario. This project is designed to help you understand the types of strategies that can be adopted and address the various audiences you will encounter. Milestone Two Scenario An overseas contractor that is a major supplier to your chosen company has recently revealed as one that operates with poor working conditions for employees (uses child labor, pays low wages, requires long hours, no benefits, etc.). Examples of each type of corporate communication: Informational Example: When a new product is launched, the public will know nothing about it. Consider the situation when Apple launched the iPad, a totally new class of technology. In order to generate interest, the company first had to tell people about the product. Educational Example: Once the target audience is aware of the new product, they often need to be educated as to why the product could be useful to them.Persuasive Example: Once a new product has become successful, it is highly likely competitors will have entered the market. Communication therefore needs to persuade the target audience to purchase the version that the corporation provides rather a competitor’s version. For the assignment, the following critical elements must be addressed: Communication Context: Provide an overview of the scenario that your communication strategy will address, in the context of the company you have selected for your final project. (Company selected: Starbucks Coffee Company)Communication Need: Considering both internal and external audiences, explain the stakeholder management issue(s) that must be addressed due to this scenario. What specifically caused the need for the identified communications?Internal Communication:External Communication:Conditions Communication Strategy: Summarize the communication strategy utilized to address this scenario. Why was it the best approach for this scenario? What alternative strategies did you consider, and why was your approach the best option? Provide justification to support your communication strategy. Explain the type of internal communication and the purpose for the internal communication that you have chosen (i.e., informational, educational, and/or persuasive). Detail your process for selecting the type of communication that will address the scenario. Provide justification as to why the chosen strategy is appropriate for the scenario. Identify the intended target audiences for the internal communication, and then explain why they have been selected as the target audience. Provide justification for selected the identified target audience. Develop a draft communication that could be sent to the identified internal target audience addressing this scenario. Ensure that the appropriate tone and message are communicated in your draft communication. Explain the type of external communication and the purpose for the external communication that you have chosen (i.e., informational, educational, and/or persuasive). Detail your process for selected the type of communication that will address the scenario. Provide justification as to why the chosen strategy is appropriate for the scenario. Identify the intended target audience for the external communication, and then explain why they have been selected as the target audience. Provide justification for selecting the identified target audience. Develop a draft communication that could be sent to the identified external target audience addressing this scenario. Ensure that the appropriate tone and message are communicated in your draft communication. Guidelines for Submission: Double-spaced Word document, 12-point Times New Roman font, one-inch margins, APA format. Page length requirements: 3-5 pages, not including title page and references.Learning ObjectivesCraft communications to address internal and external stakeholder issuesCraft communications to illustrate various strategies and approaches
utilized by corporations in their communications with stakeholdersReading and ResourcesRequired ResourcesTextbookCorporate Communication: A Guide to Theory and Practice, Chapter 10While you read, consider the following questions:Why is it necessary for a corporation to manage issues that arise?How can issues impact a corporation’s reputation?How do corporations ensure they are aware of issues quickly and efficiently?How do corporations determine what type of response is required when an issue becomes public?eBook: Handbook of Corporate Communication and Public Relations: Pure and AppliedToday’s Corporate Communication Function (pp. 200–226) While you read, consider the following questions:What impact could the issue have on the corporation and/or its stakeholders, both internal and external?Could the corporation take a more active approach to deal with the issue once it has arisen? If so, how?What could the corporation have done to be proactive about the issue? Could it have prevented the issue from causing a problem?Study the life cycle of an issue, focusing on where it starts, how it is communicated, and by whom it is communicated.eBook: Essentials of Corporate CommunicationsChapter 2: From Communication to Reputation While you read, consider the following questions:Do you understand the differences between a company’s brand, image, and reputation?What can cause a negative impact on a company’s brand, image, or reputation?Note: SNHU has limited access to this resource. Please view this alternative resource if you experience any difficulty viewing the eBook.eBook: Reputation Management: The Key to Successful Public Relations and Corporate CommunicationChapter 13: Corporate Responsibility While you read, consider the following questions:What does compliance have to do with corporate social responsibility (CSR)?What does the issue of human rights have to do with corporate profitability?Do corporations communicate their CSR activities? If so, to whom and how?
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MKT 690 Milestone Two: Conditions Communication Strategy Guidelines and Rubric
As a marketing consultant, you will need to advise clients on the development of a communication strategy that has contingencies to address situations such as
the one presented in the scenario. This project is designed to help you understand the types of strategies that can be adopted and address the various audiences
you will encounter.
Milestone Two Scenario
An overseas contractor that is a major supplier to your chosen company has recently been revealed as one that operates with poor working conditions for
employees (uses child labor, pays low wages, requires long hours, no benefits, etc.).
In Module Three, you will submit the conditions communication strategy for presented scenario. For the communication strategy, select either informational,
educational, or persuasive communication strategies, or you may choose an approach that utilizes a combination of these strategies. Your strategy will depend on
the nature of the message along with the target audience.
Examples of each type of corporate communication:
a) Informational Example: When a new product is launched, the public will know nothing about it. Consider the situation when Apple launched the iPad, a
totally new class of technology. In order to generate interest, the company first had to tell people about the product.
b) Educational Example: Once the target audience is aware of the new product, they often need to be educated as to why the product could be useful to
them.
c) Persuasive Example: Once a new product has become successful, it is highly likely competitors will have entered the market. Communication therefore
needs to persuade the target audience to purchase the version that the corporation provides rather than a competitor’s version.
For the assignment, the following critical elements must be addressed:
I.
Communication Context: Provide an overview of the scenario that your communication strategy will address, in the context of the company you have
selected for your final project.
II. Communication Need: Considering both internal and external audiences, explain the stakeholder management issue(s) that must be addressed due to
this scenario. What specifically caused the need for the identified communications?
III.
Internal Communication:
a) Explain the type of internal communication and the purpose for the internal communication that you have chosen (i.e., informational,
educational, and/or persuasive). Detail your process for selecting the type of communication that will address the scenario. Provide justification
as to why the chosen strategy is appropriate for the scenario.
b) Identify the intended target audience for the internal communication, and then explain why they have been selected as the target audience.
Provide justification for selecting the identified target audience.
c) Develop a draft communication that could be sent to the identified internal target audience addressing this scenario. Ensure that the
appropriate tone and message are communicated in your draft communication.
IV.
External Communication:
a) Explain the type of external communication and the purpose for the external communication that you have chosen (i.e., informational,
educational, and/or persuasive). Detail your process for selecting the type of communication that will address the scenario. Provide justification
as to why the chosen strategy is appropriate for the scenario.
b) Identify the intended target audience for the external communication, and then explain why they have been selected as the target audience.
Provide justification for selecting the identified target audience.
c) Develop a draft communication that could be sent to the identified external target audience addressing this scenario. Ensure that the
appropriate tone and message are communicated in your draft communication.
V. Conditions Communication Strategy: Summarize the communication strategy utilized to address this scenario. Why was it the best approach for this
scenario? What alternative strategies did you consider, and why was your approach the best option? Provide justification to support your communication
strategy.
Rubric
Guidelines for Submission: Double-spaced Word document, 12-point Times New Roman font, one-inch margins, APA format. Page length requirements: 3–5
pages, not including title page and references.
Critical Elements
Communication Context
Communication Need
Internal:
Type and Purpose
Internal: Target Audience
Internal:
Draft Communication
External:
Type and Purpose
External: Target Audience
Proficient (100%)
Provides an overview of the
scenario using the chosen company
to provide appropriate context for
the situation
Explains the need for both internal
and external communications
addressed to appropriate audiences
and outlines the stakeholder
management issues
Provides an explanation of the type
of internal communication
providing justification for selection,
and provides support by explaining
the communication’s purpose
Identifies the target audience and
provides an explanation of
justification
Provides an appropriate draft
internal communication that
appropriately addresses the
scenario
Provides an explanation of the type
of external communication
providing justification for selection,
and provides support by explaining
the communications purpose
Identifies the target audience and
provides an explanation of
justification
Needs Improvement (75%)
Provides a limited overview of the
scenario and does not fully utilize
the chosen company to provide
appropriate context
Provides a limited explanation of
the need for communication, and
does not fully address both internal
and external audiences, and/or
does not fully outline the
stakeholder management issues
Provides limited explanation of the
type of internal communication
with little to no justification, and
does not fully explain its purpose
Not Evident (0%)
Does not provide an overview of the
scenario
Value
5
Does not explain the need for
internal and external
communication and does not
outline the stakeholder
management issues
10
Does not explain the type of
communication or its purpose
10
Does not identify a clearly defined
target audience or provides a
limited justification for that
selection
Develops a draft internal
communication that does not fully
address the scenario
Does not identify the target
audience or does not justify the
selection
5
Does not develop a draft
communication addressing the
scenario
20
Provides limited explanation of the
type of external communication
with little to no justification, and
does not fully explain its purpose
Does not explain the type of
communication or its purpose
10
Does not identify a clearly defined
target audience or provides a
limited justification for that
selection
Does not identify the target
audience or does not justify the
selection
5
External: Draft
Communication
Communication Strategy
Articulation of Response
Provides an appropriate draft
external communication that
appropriately addresses the
scenario
Provides a clear summary of the
communication strategy that is
supported with adequate evidence
to justify the approach adopted
Submission has no major errors
related to citations, grammar,
spelling, or syntax
Develops a draft external
communication that does not fully
address the scenario
Does not develop a draft
communication addressing the
scenario
20
Provides a limited summary of the
communication strategy, and does
not provide a complete justification
for the approach adopted
Submission has major errors related
to citations, grammar, spelling, or
syntax that negatively impact
readability and articulation of main
ideas
Does not provide a summary of the
communication strategy with
justification
10
Submission has critical errors
related to citations, grammar,
spelling, or syntax that prevent
understanding of ideas
5
Earned Total
100%
Introduction
“An organization’s reputation is the sum of how its various stakeholders view it. But all too often
companies leave such stakeholder perceptions to chance” (Doorley & Garcia, 2006, pp. 384). Corporations
that understand the role communication can have in the way their stakeholders perceive the company
actively strive to use their communication approach to enhance their corporate reputation. However, such is
the extent of social media today that communications about any event can come from almost any source, at
any time, anywhere, and be transmitted around the world, not just by people viewing social media, but also
by the mainstream media.
What Can Affect a Corporation’s Reputation?
Thirty, or perhaps even twenty years ago, if a major event occurred in a country, the reporting of that event
was primarily in the country where the event took place, but that is no longer the case today. With the
increasing growth in internet usage, and the ever-increasing number of social media networks, an event in
one country can become news in many others within minutes of it happening. When US Airways Flight
1549 encountered difficulties and landed in the middle of the Hudson River in 2009, the event was captured
live by people using their cell phones and transmitted around the world within minutes. This illustrates how
anyone with a smartphone is potentially a reporter who can make an event very public, very quickly.
When an earthquake struck Japan in 2011 and was followed by a massive tsunami that hit the Tokyo
Electric Power Company (TEPCO) Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, the events once again were
transmitted live around the world within minutes. However, not only were the earthquake and tsunami
reported, but so was the ensuing corporate storm that engulfed TEPCO and its senior management, leading
to the resignation its president (Powell, 2012). This illustrates how events can very quickly become global
news and how they can have significant ramifications on both a corporation and those who work for it.
General Motors was forced to issue a number of recalls in 2014 “for problems ranging from unsecured
floor mats to the ignition-switch defect been linked to at least 13 deaths. These 54 separate recall
campaigns affected as many as 26 million vehicles in the U.S. The recalls have turned into a publicrelations nightmare for the company, raising questions about GM’s management culture and its safety
protocols. (Squire, 2014, para. 1–2)
As a result, the career of the only female CEO of a major car company in the United States could be called
into question even though she only recently took the helm. Irrespective of whether that is considered fair,
she is the face of GM, she is the one having to report the corporate malfeasance to the world, she is the one
having to answer to the questioning by legislators, and she is likely to be the one who could be called to be
the corporate representative in any lawsuits that may result.
The Impact of the Internet
The internet can enable companies to present their viewpoint to their stakeholders on a range of issues.
However, what happens after a message is transmitted and to whom the message is transmitted is outside
companies’ control (Forman & Argenti, 2006). By way of example, a message from senior management to
employees posted on the internal intranet about a sensitive issue, such as discrimination, could all too easily
be transmitted to a far wider audience via the internet. This can then have far-reaching implications as
investors and other external stakeholders react, causing downward pressure on the share price and the value
of the company.
Stakeholders could read customer complaints posted on blogs or other forms of social media. Such posts
can affect the perception of the company and potentially have a negative impact the operation of the
business. A case in point was the damage caused by a negative review of a restaurant posted by one
unhappy customer in France. In an attempt to regain a degree of control, some companies have taken action
against such blogs. In many instances, the company is not successful and could incur the wrath of the
media for attempting to “gag” its critics. However, in the instance of the French restaurant blogger, the
French judge ruled in favor of a company. The judge argued that the “scathing restaurant review was too
prominent in Google search results” (Rawlinson, 2014, para. 1). Consequently, the judge ordered the post’s
title to be amended in addition to ordering the blogger to pay significant damages (Rawlinson, 2014). In
this case, the company won the case in the courts, but the question then becomes whether the increased
publicity generated by going to court made the result worthwhile. Did the corporation win in the court of
public opinion? Only time will tell.
Although, not responding could also create a problem, as Forman and Argenti (2006) explained:
Jeff Jarvis, on his blog BuzzMachine, chronicled his negative experience with Dell’s customer service,
corporate communications, and head of marketing. Traffic to his site doubled to over 10,000 hits per day
during this time, and the media and investors noticed the situation, calling into question Dell’s customer
service in a very public topic. (p. 359)
Jarvis’s blog (2005) provided details of what happened and how news of the problem spread by word of
mouth, and he also offered the following advice to Dell:
• Read blogs
• Talk with consumers
• Blog
• Listen to your bad press
The advice is sound if corporations wish to avoid the problems these case examples illustrate.
Consequently, when faced with a situation that could potentially become a crisis, a clear communication
strategy is required, identifying what action is going to be taken, by whom, when and where (i.e., what
media channel[s] will be used), and who the target audiences will be. Failure to adopt such a strategy
creates the potential for the situation to spiral out of control, where any action could be perceived as being
too little, too late.
Conclusion
A corporation’s reputation can be impacted by all sorts of events, some of which may be of the
corporation’s making, some of which the corporation has little or no control over. How the company reacts
to the reporting of issues and events can determine how its stakeholders perceive it, both internal and
external. As the examples above illustrate, events can become public knowledge very quickly, and news
spread across the globe in minutes. How the company reacts, what communications it provides, and how
quickly it provides them can significantly influence public opinion. As Dell discovered, not reacting at the
time may not be the best approach, and as GM learned to its misfortune, reacting well after the event can
potentially make matters worse, with any communication viewed as too little, too late.
References
Cornelissen, J. (2014). Corporate communication: A guide to theory & practice. London, UK: Sage.
Doorley, J., & Garcia, H. (2006). Reputation management: The key to successful public relations and corporate
communication. Florence, KY: Routledge.
Forman, J., & Argenti, P. (2006). How technology has influenced the field of corporate communication. Journal of
Business and Technical Communication, 20(3), 357–370.
Jarvis, J. (2005, August 17). Dear Mr. Dell. BuzzMachine. Retrieved from http://buzzmachine.com/2005/08/17/dearmr-dell/
Powell, B. (2012, April 20). Fukushima Daiichi: Inside the debacle. Fortune. Retrieved from
http://fortune.com/2012/04/20/fukushima-daiichi-inside-the-debacle/
Rawlinson, K. (2014, July 16). French blogger fined over review’s Google search placing. BBC. Retrieved from
http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-28331598
Squire, S. (2014, August). GM recalls: The numbers tell a surprising story. Market Watch. Retrieved from
http://projects.marketwatch.com/2014/gm-recalls-the-numbers-tell-a-surprising-story/
External Communication
From: Starbucks Coffee Company
To: Coffee Equipment Company
To Whom It May Concern:
Starbucks Coffee Company is devoted to improving and bettering the lives of our
employees as well as the society around us. The management appreciates the presence of
employees and their contribution to the success and competitiveness of the company.
One thing the company does not compromise is the compliance issue, and it ensures that
the employees are well compensated, enjoy all the benefits, and are not overworked. The
company has realized that it’s reasonable to work with companies that are complaints to
labor laws. “We expect our vendors to be compliant and act responsibly and promote
safe practices.”
It has come to the company attention that you have been employing minors,
underpaying and overworking your employs which violates our Business Ethics and
Compliance code as agreed in our contract. By employing minors and allowing your
employees to overwork and underpay them, you have breached our agreement and it
sounds that you’re not tenable to be our supplier. Our company expects you to observe
and uphold each segment of the labor law. Starbucks appreciates your contribution to our
company. We are sure that through complying with our Business Ethics and Compliance
code you will also comply with the labor laws. We regret that we will not require your
services until you fulfill all the requirements.
Our company is committed to helping other companies to comply with its supplier
responsibility code. We are optimistic that your company will come up with a strategy of
addressing the in compliance in your company. Starbucks will be doing a follow up to
find how your company will implement a good action plan.
Sincerely,
Starbucks Coffee Company
Internal Communication
From: Starbucks Coffee Company
Sent: January 9, 2019
To: All Employees
Subject: Coffee Equipment Company Non-compliance with Starbucks Business Ethics
and Compliance Code
Our department has received information that our vendor Coffee Equipment
Company violates our company Business Ethics and Compliance code. We are informed
that the supplier has been underpaying, overworking, and employing minor employees.
Also, it’s reported that the supplier offers no benefits to the employees. You’re aware
that according to the company policy, the sourcing department is responsible for
addressing such issues. However, it’s important to reassure the supplier that our company
is willing to help in the process of developing an action plan. The supplier services will
be terminated temporarily until they rectify the matter. If they are unwilling to change
their actions, we will let the supplier understand that their relationship with the company
will completely be terminated.

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