PLEASE SEE ATTACHED FILES FOR ASSIGNMENT DETAIL AND INFORMATION!!! Deliverable Length: 750 – 1,000 words Description: The CIO wants to make sure that your project schedule is accurate, that the project does not bring big surprises that are not planned for, and that he can be sure that what is needed gets accomplished. Your presentation to the project staff on the PERT techniques was highly appraised. However, having reviewed your WBS and the project time estimates, the CIO is now concerned about the project schedule and would like to see if the schedule can be shortened. Review your project WBS and activity durations and estimates and perform schedule compression techniques such as crashing, fast-tracking, and scope reduction. Then, write a memo to him assuring him of how you have reviewed ways to shorten the schedule and how all these things are controlled; explain the value of PERT estimating, critical path, schedule compression techniques, risk matrices, and earned value management. In your write-up be sure to advise the CIO whether or not your review techniques resulted in shortening the project duration, and indicate whether or not this will affect the overall project cost and quality. Assignment Guidelines: Using your course materials, the textbook, the library, and the academic quality resources, research the following: The value of Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT) estimating The value of Critical Path Method (CPM) The value of schedule compression techniques Risk matrices The value of Earned Value Management (EVM) In 750–1,000 words, address the following: Explain how each of the above project management elements or concepts affect the scheduling and controlling of a project. Explain how the above project management elements or concepts affect a project manager’s ability to make project and segment trade-offs. Use correctly APA style formatted references of solid academic quality for your resources and use correctly formatted APA style in-text citations to your references to substantiate your information and positions as well as to give credit to other author’s work. Submitted Assignment The submitted Word document should do the following: Completely adhere to the assignment guidelines listed above. Your word document write up should consist of 750–1,000 words. Include a title page with the course name, phase number, topic title, and your first and last names. Include a reference slide using APA style to ensure that credit for others’ work is acknowledged. The title and reference pages do not count as part of the total of 750–1,000 words.
pm_620_ip4_notes.docx

project_deliverable_part_2.docx

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PLEASE SEE ATTACHED FILES FOR ASSIGNMENT DETAIL AND INFORMATION!!!
Deliverable Length: 750 – 1,000 words
Description:
The CIO wants to make sure that your project schedule is accurate, that the project does not bring big
surprises that are not planned for, and that he can be sure that what is needed gets accomplished. Your
presentation to the project staff on the PERT techniques was highly appraised. However, having
reviewed your WBS and the project time estimates, the CIO is now concerned about the project
schedule and would like to see if the schedule can be shortened. Review your project WBS and activity
durations and estimates and perform schedule compression techniques such as crashing, fast-tracking,
and scope reduction. Then, write a memo to him assuring him of how you have reviewed ways to
shorten the schedule and how all these things are controlled; explain the value of PERT estimating,
critical path, schedule compression techniques, risk matrices, and earned value management. In your
write-up be sure to advise the CIO whether or not your review techniques resulted in shortening the
project duration, and indicate whether or not this will affect the overall project cost and quality.
Assignment Guidelines:


Using your course materials, the textbook, the library, and the academic quality resources,
research the following:
o
The value of Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT) estimating
o
The value of Critical Path Method (CPM)
o
The value of schedule compression techniques
o
Risk matrices
o
The value of Earned Value Management (EVM)
In 750–1,000 words, address the following:
o
Explain how each of the above project management elements or concepts affect the
scheduling and controlling of a project.
o
Explain how the above project management elements or concepts affect a project
manager’s ability to make project and segment trade-offs.
Use correctly APA style formatted references of solid academic quality for your resources and use
correctly formatted APA style in-text citations to your references to substantiate your information and
positions as well as to give credit to other author’s work.
Submitted Assignment

The submitted Word document should do the following:
o
Completely adhere to the assignment guidelines listed above.
o
Your word document write up should consist of 750–1,000 words.

Include a title page with the course name, phase number, topic title, and your first
and last names.

Include a reference slide using APA style to ensure that credit for others’ work is
acknowledged.

The title and reference pages do not count as part of the total of 750–1,000
words.
2019
Work Breakdown
Structure and PERT
UNIT 3 GROUP PROJECT – PM620-1901A-01
BRITTANY KLEMKO, DARIUS WHITE, ALBERT ARSENEAULT, JASON CARTER
Table of Contents
Introduction ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 2
Work Breakdown Structure ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 2
PERT calculations……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3
PERT Table………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 5
References:…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 6
1
Introduction
The company has determined a need for an upgraded email system based on the issue of
interruptions negatively effecting business. The project requirements have been determined and
the project needs to be started as soon as possible and finished as quickly as possible. In order to
move forward with the project and manage it appropriately, we need a work breakdown structure
or WBS.
Work Breakdown Structure
The work breakdown structure (WBS) can be used as a foundation to the phases used to
manage a project successfully. The WBS is structured to provide the objectives, deliverable and
decomposed activities required to achieve the end result of the project. It provides a brief
description of the scope. The WBS also shows us what activities are dependent on each other and
the resources needed to complete the activity listed. The WBS for the email upgrade project can
be found as an attachment to this document titled Group 1 – PM620-01-1901A.
For a Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) to be effective, it needs to have the following
information:

100% of the Deliverables – Every step in the whole process needs to be identified and
written down; from the largest project to the smallest detail. A project manager cannot
afford to leave anything out of the WBS. The sum of the work listed in the lower levels
of the WBS should equal the sum of the work that is listed in the higher levels.

WBS Dictionary – This is more than defining terms in the WBS as it also refers to each
milestone, task, cost and deliverable that should be considered.
2

Hierarchy of Elements – The WBS works backward from the final goal. Each level that is
broken down creates another level to be broken down. Decomposing the hierarchy is how
a successful WBS is created.

Minimum Detail – While this sounds like the opposite of what a WBS should be, keeping
the details that are easily figured out is best for keeping the WBS clear and concise
(Smartsheet, 2018).
The work breakdown structure is an extremely useful tool for a project, from the planning
phase of estimating a schedule to the delivery phase, used to assessing progress. A work
breakdown structure helps to define everything that is needed of a project in order to organize the
project, provide graphical visual, and complete the project. The hierarchical structure provides
the project team, stakeholders, and vendors with a clear outline of the project activities broken
down from complex activities to smaller, more manageable tasks (PMI, 2017). For the email
system upgrade project, I first began by identifying all elements then populating those elements.
This helped to organize responsibilities within packages pf work. A successful work breakdown
structure is comprised by the entire project team, stakeholders, experts within the field, and
vendors in order to get the best possible outcome. Deliverables, milestones, technical
requirements, and limits and exclusions from the scope of the project are all essential
information used for the work breakdown structure.
PERT calculations
After considering the mentioned project, the deliverables and activates highlighted on the
work breakdown structure shows that the project will finish in about 300 days. The estimation of
the project duration followed the analysis of the nature of each activity as compared to the
3
others. Some tasks require more time to complete as compared to the others. In the attempt to
produce realistic figures on the project completion dates, this section uses PERT as the ultimate
framework and tool. PERT is a valuable tool in calculating risk into a project that is unknown or
not known well enough to use an analogous method of estimating. PERT uses various figures
that help to come up with three different columns to compare the possible completion duration
for the entire project. The three figures include the optimistic, the pessimistic and finally, the
most probable durations. However, project managers usually use these figures to find the most
probable or likely duration for the completion of the underlying work to support the planning
tasks. In this case, the PERT formula used to generate the final figures is E = (To + 4(Tm) + Tp)
/ 6. In simple terms, this formula calculates that e = (the pessimistic less the optimistic figure)/6
(Kerzner & Kerzner, 2017). The attached table summarizes the figures obtained after the
calculations.
The formula above shows the figures of the four different durations. In this case, the
selected durations include the optimistic, the most likely, the pessimistic and finally, the
projected completion duration. The bullish term shows the period that the team expects and
desires to complete the project. The highly likely figure shows the project will consume the
period that the team sees. The pessimistic time refers to the worst-case scenario where the project
consumes way too much time as expected. The expected duration shows the duration in which
the team plans for the work to be completed. These durations play a considerable role in that they
inform the project team to produce the final duration estimates that would help to make informed
decisions on the planning and scheduling of the entire process (Burke, 2013). The attached table
below shows the time estimates based on PERT principles.
4
PERT Table
Task
Email System Upgrade Project
Phase 1 – Project Team
Outline Roles
Outline Responsibilities
Assign Team Members
Establish a Communication Plan
Phase 2 – Develop One Email System
Define Email System Requirements
Perform Risk Evaluation
Determine Resources Needed
Find/Develop Email System
Get Email System Approved
Finalize Email System
Phase 3 – Set up New System Infrastructure
Determine Best Infrastructure
Get Approval for Infrastructure
Purchase Infrastructure Needed
Set up LAN Lines for New Users
Hire Contractor for Development/Purchase
System
Install System
Test System
Evaluate System
Final Approval of New System
Phase 4 – Develop Standards and Protocol
Determine Standards and Protocols
Draft Standards and Protocols
Get Approval for Standards and Protocols
Final Standards and Protocols Developed
Distribute Standards and Protocols
Phase 5 – Train Employees on New Protocol
Develop Training
Internal Training or Hire Trainers
Schedule Training
Admin/Management Training
Staff Training
Most
Optimistic
96 days
5 days
2 days
2 days
1 day
1 day
14 days
2 days
2 days
2 days
4 days
1 day
1 day
35 days
3 days
1 day
3 days
12 days
3 days
Most
Likely
111 days
7 days
3 days
3 days
2 days
2 days
17 days
3 days
3 days
3 days
5 days
1 day
2 days
38 days
4 days
2 days
5 days
15 days
1 day
1 day
1 day
1 day
10 days
3 days
2 days
1 day
1 day
1 day
30 days
10 days
3 days
1 day
5 days
10 days
2 days
2 days
2 days
1 day
14 days
4 days
5 days
2 days
2 days
1 day
35 days
12 days
5 days
2 days
7 days
14 days
5 days
Most
Pessimistic
162 days
13 days
5 days
5 days
3 days
3 days
29 days
5 days
5 days
5 days
7 days
3 days
4 days
52 days
6 days
3 days
7 days
18 days
7 days
Expected
Estimate
117 days
7.66 days
3.17 days
3.17 days
2 days
2 days
18.5 days
3.17 days
3.17 days
3.17 days
5.17 days
1.3 day
2.16 days
39.83 days
4.17 days
2 days
5 days
15 days
5 days
3 days
3 days
3 days
2 days
17 days
6 days
7 days
3 days
3 days
2 days
46 days
15 days
7 days
3 days
10 days
18 days
2 days
2 days
2 days
1.17 day
13.83 days
4.17 days
4.83 days
2 days
2 days
1.17 day
36 days
12.17 days
5 days
2 days
7.17 days
14 days
5
Receive Feedback
Address Concerns as Needed
Monitor Trained Employees during
Implementation
Provide Status Reports and Feedback
Reports
Assess needed resources availability
Phase 6 – Set up Help Desk and Support
Advertise Help Desk Position(s)
Interview Staff
Hire Staff
Train Staff
Phase 7 – Move Users, Old and New into New
System
Phase 8 – Project Close
Project Evaluation
Project Feedback
18 days
18 days
18 days
18 days
21 days
21 days
21 days
21 days
18 days
25 days
12 days
3 days
1 day
3 days
1 day
21 days
30 days
15 days
5 days
1 day
5 days
1 day
1 day
1 day
1 day
1 day
1 day
2 days
28 days
28 days
28 days
21.17 days
21.17 days
21.66 days
28 days
21.17 days
28 days
38 days
18 days
7 days
2 days
7 days
3 days
21.17 days
30.5 days
15 days
5 days
1.17 day
5 days
2 days
2 days
2 days
2 days
1.17 day
1.17 day
1.17 day
References:
Brotherton, S. A., Fried, R. T., & Norman, E. S. (2008). Applying the work breakdown structure
to the project management lifecycle. Paper presented at PMI® Global Congress 2008—
North America, Denver, CO. Newtown Square, PA: Project Management Institute.
Burke, R. (2013). Project management: planning and control techniques. New Jersey, USA.
Kerzner, H., & Kerzner, H. R. (2017). Project management: a systems approach to planning,
scheduling, and controlling. John Wiley & Sons.
Project Management Institute (2017). A guide to the project management body of knowledge
(PMBOK guide) Sixth Edition. Newtown Square Pennsylvania.
Smartsheet. (2018, October 12). All About Work Breakdown Structures (WBS) | Smartsheet.
Retrieved from https://www.smartsheet.com/getting-started-work-breakdown-structures
wbs
6

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