Assignment InstructionsClass,This week you are required to submit a case study analysis. Your paper analysis should be between 3 – 5 pages, not counting the title and reference page. No submission should be fewer than 1050 words.Include a clear and concise introduction.Format your case study assignment paper so that the three questions asked below are clearly defined. Double space your work, cite your work, limit quotes, and edit your work well for spelling, grammar, and punctuation errors. If you use any quotes, you must increase the length of your paper to compensate. Make sure you have two additional references other than the text and use citations. This case study analysis will be based on the 35 case studies in your textbook (page 540-541). You are to pick ONE (1) of the companies from your text. Choose a company different from the company you used for the week five paper. You may not have two papers about the same company. You may not use a paper or any part of a paper from a previous class. Name your selection on your title page. No abstract is required.Read the case study and answer the following questions in your paper.1. Assess the effectiveness of your company’s leadership.2. Discuss the basis of your company’s competitive advantage and the potential challenges to its strategy.3. What growth strategies might your company pursue? Submit your paper into the assignment section of the classroom.Font and Spacing – Use Times New Roman 12 pitch font with double-spaced lines.Length – Write a 3 to 5 page analysis not including the title page and citation page. No fewer than 1050 words!Reference Page – Include all sources including your textbook on a Reference pageUtilize the APA Style for documenting sources. You will need to include at least 2 sources in addition to your text. Finally, remember Wikipedia is NOT a scholarly source.Punctuation, essay format (thesis, supporting paragraphs with transition and topic sentences, and summary) grammar and documentation count toward your grade. Review the Grading Rubric attached here for detailed information about the essay grading criteria.Late papers will have deductions.
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Hello Students,
Read Chapter 14 of our text.
http://ezproxy.apus.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&scope=sit
e&db=nlebk&db=nlabk&AN=1418653
Launch the week seven lesson in the lesson section of the classroom.
Read this article – Relationship between leadership styles and organizational innovation.
Before beginning this week, please watch the attached Powerpoint presentation. There is sound
attached to this presentation so when you open it, select slide show and allow it to advance
automatically.
ENTREPRENEURS
Emotional intelligence (EI) is a key element of effective strategic leadership. EI refers to an
individual’s capacity for recognizing one’s emotions and those of others.
In previous weeks, we focused on “what leaders do and how they do it.” This week, we address
“who leaders are.” That is, we focus on individual attributes instead of leader behavior. It is
important to point out that these two issues are highly related because successful leaders possess
valuable traits that enable them to engage effectively in activities to create value for their
organization.
Although there have been countless studies of leader traits and skills (e.g., integrity, maturity,
energy, intelligence), we address one that has really garnered a lot of attention in both the
academic and business presses: Emotional Intelligence (EI). This concept has been popularized
by Daniel Goleman who has published best-selling books.
Recent studies have found that effective leaders have a high level of EI and that EI is a better
predictor of life and career success than IQ (intelligence quotient). The five components of EI
are:
Self-Awareness, Self-Regulation, Motivation, Empathy, and, Social Skill
Globalization is another reason for the increasing importance of empathy (one of the five
elements of EI) for business leaders. Cross-cultural dialogue can often result in miscues and
misunderstandings. Empathy is a valuable antidote. Managers who have it are attuned to
subtleties in body language. They can hear messages beneath the words being spoken. Further,
they have a deep understanding of the existence and importance of cultural and ethnic
differences.
For example, consider the case of an American consultant whose team has just presented a
proposal to a Japanese client. When dealing with fellow Americans, the team was accustomed to
being bombarded with questions after such a proposal. However, this time it was greeted with a
long silence. Most of the members of the team interpreted the silence as disapproval and were
ready to leave. However, the lead consultant gestured them to stop. Although he was not very
familiar with Japanese culture, he was able to read the client’s face and posture and sensed not
rejection but interest – even deep consideration. He was correct. When the client finally spoke, it
was to award the consulting firm with the job.
Reference
Goleman, D. 1998. What makes a leader? Harvard Business Review, 76(6): 93-102.
There are some potential drawbacks of EI. Below are a few flipsides of the benefits of its
essential components if taken in the wrong context.
1. Effective leaders have empathy for others (leaders may confuse empathy with sympathy and
fail to make “hard decisions”)
2. Effective leaders are astute judges of people (leaders may rely too much on their judgment and
dismiss others’ insights)
3. Effective leaders are passionate about what they do, and they show it (passion may prevent
leaders from other possibilities and ignore realities that others see)
4. Effective leaders create personal connections with their people (if there are too many
unannounced visits, it may lead to fear of micromanagement.)
Corporate entrepreneurship (CE) refers to building entrepreneurial businesses within existing
corporations. It has two primary aims: the creation of new venture opportunities and strategic
renewal. In this section, we address corporate growth and renewal via internal venture
development.
All the factors that influence the strategy implementation process – corporate culture, leadership,
features of organizational structure, and rewards and learning systems – will affect how
corporations engage in internal corporate venturing.
In some large corporations, the spirit of entrepreneurship permeates every part of the
organization. It is found in companies where the strategic leaders and the culture together
generate a strong impetus to innovate, take risks, and seek out new venture opportunities.
Firms using a focused approach typically separate the corporate venturing activity from the other
ongoing operations of the firm. That is, CE is usually the domain of autonomous work groups
that pursue entrepreneurial aims independent of the rest of the firm.
Two forms – new venture groups (NVGs) and business incubators – are among the most common
types of focused approaches.
Corporations often form new venture groups whose goal is to identify, evaluate, and cultivate
venture opportunities. These groups typically function as semi-autonomous units with little
formal structure. A NVG’s mandate often extends beyond innovation and experimentation to
coordinating with other corporate divisions, identifying potential venture partners, gathering
resources, and, in some case, actually launching the venture.
Business incubators are designed to “hatch” new businesses. They are a type of corporate new
venture group with a more specialized purpose – to support and nurture fledgling entrepreneurial
ventures until they can thrive on their own as standalone businesses.
A culture of entrepreneurship is one in which the search for venture opportunities permeates
every part of the organization. Everyone is attuned to opportunities to leverage the assets and
capabilities of the corporation to create new businesses.
After reading this week’s material answer ONE (1) of the following three questions in this
forum:
1 – In your own words, define Emotional Intelligence (EI) and describe the key elements of EI
and discuss how it differs from Intelligent Quotient (IQ). Why is EI so important to successful
strategic leadership? Do you think that EI or IQ is more important for effective leadership and/or
management? Give an example of a leader you have known with high EI and explain your
selection.
2 – Discuss turnaround strategies and when an organization needs to develop one. Give an
example of a company that has recently taken on a turnaround strategy. Did it work? Explain.
3 – Describe (in your own words) organizational ambidexterity.
cons?
What are the pros and
Give an example of an organization who has organizational ambidexterity.
Instructions:
Your initial post should be at least 250 words, not including repeated questions, references and
quotes. Please respond to at least 2 other students. Responses should be a minimum of 100
words. Use your own words.
Entrepreneurs, Culture,
and Entrepreneurial
Culture
Marlene E. Weaver, MBA
School of Business
Topics for discussion



Introduction
What is an entrepreneur?
What is organizational culture?
What is entrepreneurial culture?
Why is it important to know the
difference?
Introduction
Entrepreneur
– Culture
– Entrepreneurship
– Entrepreneurial
culture

What is an entrepreneur?
The Webster (1988) dictionary describes an
entrepreneur as “a person who organizes
and manages a business undertaking,
assuming the risk for the sake of profit”
(p.454).
How do we describe an entrepreneur?
– an inventor of a business
– a risk taker
Other thoughts about entrepreneurs

Inventions are important
Entrepreneurs are important
New ideas
New stores
New services
Culture
The Webster (1988) dictionary describes
culture as “the ideas, customs, skills, arts,
etc. of a people or group, that are
transferred, communicated, or passed
along (p. 337).
– Western culture
– Eastern culture
– Religious culture
– Organizational culture
Organizational Culture
– Dess, Lumpkin and Eisner (2010) describe
organizational culture as “ a system of shared
values and beliefs that shape a company’s
people, organizational structures, and control
systems to produce behavioral norms” (p. 317).
– Formal culture
– Informal culture
– Entrepreneurial culture
Formal Organizational Culture

Dress code
Strict hours (9 – 5)
Meeting rules
Lunch hour rules
Timeclocks
Informal Organizational Culture

Relaxed dress code
Flex hours
Open lunch periods
Informal meetings
No time clocks
Entrepreneurial Culture
Dess, Lumpkin and Eisner (2010)
describe an entrepreneurial culture as one
where “the search for venture opportunities
permeates every part of the organization” (p.
440).
– everyone feels the spirit
– no idea is a bad idea
– innovation begins at all levels
Entrepreneurial Culture

Can be formal or informal
New ideas for improvement are welcomed
Level does not matter
Size does not matter
Age does not matter
Summary
Remember that some of the best innovations
in recent years have developed in a garage
by somewhat uneducated people.
In many businesses, new ideas for change
and new ideas for saving money are what
keep them competitive.
Welcome all ideas!
Questions or Comments?
Entrepreneurs, Culture,
and Entrepreneurial
Culture
Marlene E. Weaver, MBA
School of Business
Topics for discussion



Introduction
What is an entrepreneur?
What is organizational culture?
What is entrepreneurial culture?
Why is it important to know the
difference?
Introduction
Entrepreneur
– Culture
– Entrepreneurship
– Entrepreneurial
culture

What is an entrepreneur?
The Webster (1988) dictionary describes an
entrepreneur as “a person who organizes
and manages a business undertaking,
assuming the risk for the sake of profit”
(p.454).
How do we describe an entrepreneur?
– an inventor of a business
– a risk taker
Other thoughts about entrepreneurs

Inventions are important
Entrepreneurs are important
New ideas
New stores
New services
Culture
The Webster (1988) dictionary describes
culture as “the ideas, customs, skills, arts,
etc. of a people or group, that are
transferred, communicated, or passed
along (p. 337).
– Western culture
– Eastern culture
– Religious culture
– Organizational culture
Organizational Culture
– Dess, Lumpkin and Eisner (2010) describe
organizational culture as “ a system of shared
values and beliefs that shape a company’s
people, organizational structures, and control
systems to produce behavioral norms” (p. 317).
– Formal culture
– Informal culture
– Entrepreneurial culture
Formal Organizational Culture

Dress code
Strict hours (9 – 5)
Meeting rules
Lunch hour rules
Timeclocks
Informal Organizational Culture

Relaxed dress code
Flex hours
Open lunch periods
Informal meetings
No time clocks
Entrepreneurial Culture
Dess, Lumpkin and Eisner (2010)
describe an entrepreneurial culture as one
where “the search for venture opportunities
permeates every part of the organization” (p.
440).
– everyone feels the spirit
– no idea is a bad idea
– innovation begins at all levels
Entrepreneurial Culture

Can be formal or informal
New ideas for improvement are welcomed
Level does not matter
Size does not matter
Age does not matter
Summary
Remember that some of the best innovations
in recent years have developed in a garage
by somewhat uneducated people.
In many businesses, new ideas for change
and new ideas for saving money are what
keep them competitive.
Welcome all ideas!
Questions or Comments?
Assignment Instructions
Class,
This week you are required to submit a case study analysis. Your paper analysis should be
between 3 – 5 pages, not counting the title and reference page. No submission should be fewer
than 1050 words.
Include a clear and concise introduction.
Format your case study assignment paper so that the three questions asked below are clearly
defined. Double space your work, cite your work, limit quotes, and edit your work well for
spelling, grammar, and punctuation errors. If you use any quotes, you must increase the length of
your paper to compensate. Make sure you have two additional references other than the text and
use citations.
This case study analysis will be based on the 35 case studies in your textbook (page 540541). You are to pick ONE (1) of the companies from your text. Choose a company
different from the company you used for the week five paper. You may not have two
papers about the same company. You may not use a paper or any part of a paper from a
previous class. Name your selection on your title page.
No abstract is required.
Read the case study and answer the following questions in your paper.
1. Assess the effectiveness of your company’s leadership.
2. Discuss the basis of your company’s competitive advantage and the potential challenges to its
strategy.
3. What growth strategies might your company pursue?
Submit your paper into the assignment section of the classroom.
Font and Spacing – Use Times New Roman 12 pitch font with double-spaced lines.
Length – Write a 3 to 5 page analysis not including the title page and citation page. No fewer
than 1050 words!
Reference Page – Include all sources including your textbook on a Reference page
Utilize the APA Style for documenting sources. You will need to include at least 2 sources in
addition to your text. Finally, remember Wikipedia is NOT a scholarly source.
Punctuation, essay format (thesis, supporting paragraphs with transition and topic sentences, and
summary) grammar and documentation count toward your grade.
Review the Grading Rubric attached here for detailed information about the essay grading
criteria.
Late papers will have deductions.
„Management and Business Administration. Central Europe”
Vol. 23, No. 1/2015: p. 69–78, ISSN 2084-3356; e-ISSN 2300-858X
Relationship Between Leadership Styles
and Organizational Creativity
Katarzyna Bratnicka1
Primary submission: 19.02.14. Final acceptance: 14.08.14
Abstract
Purpose: Empirical research on entrepreneurship in organizations has brought disparate and often
contradictory evidence related to the impact of leadership on creativity in organizations. The purpose of this paper is to explore and discuss the impact of different leadership styles on creativity,
with the view to formulating an integrated conceptual model that links creative novelty and creative practicality with leadership.
Methodology: The author applied the methodology of meta-theoretical review. In accordance with
the principles of theoretical bricolage, a new conceptual model was built on the basis of the multidimensional creativity theory and the leadership theory. In her analysis, the author took into
account leadership styles that have already been subject to research; each of them was mapped in
the two-dimensional space of organizational creativity.
Findings: In order to fully understand the reasons for differences in organizational creativity, the
drivers of divergences in the space of creative novelty and creative practicality need to be clarified.
Greater knowledge about the impact of leadership styles on the structure and configuration of
organizational creativity is necessary. In this paper, the author provides a theoretical framework
that illustrates manners in which leadership influences organizational creativity. The model clarifies the role that leadership plays in shaping a unique configuration of organizational creativity,
and consequently in ensuring the necessary internal adaptation of an organization.
Originality: The value of this research lies in the situational interpretation of various leadership
styles in the context of their impact on organizational creativity. The analysis goes beyond the
conventional discussion about leadership and creativity, focused on establishing whether a given
leadership style proves beneficial or not for organizational creativity. The paper identifies particular effects that several key leadership styles have on organizational creativity; they are depicted in
a new theoretical framework.
Keywords: organizational creativity, leadership styles, conceptual framework
JEL: D23, L26
University of Economics in Katowice
Correspondence address: University of Economics in Katowice, 1 Maja 50 St., 40-287 Katowice, e-mail: katarzyna.bratnicka@ue.katowice.pl.
1
Vol. 23, No. 1/2015
Unauthenticated
DOI: 10.7206/mba.ce.2084-3356.134
Download Date | 6/23/17 6:55 PM
70 MBA.CE
Katarzyna Bratnicka
Introduction
The purpose of this paper is to organize and provide a synthesis of research findings
pertaining to the impact of leadership style on creativity in organizations. A recent
qualitative study carried out among 29 leaders resulted in identifying three key dimensions of leadership: “… origins and determinants of visions; forms of influence and
manners in which leaders influence their supporters and associates; attributes that
enable leaders to impact the situation” (Kozminski, 2013, p. 81). The discussion outlined in this paper pertains to the second aspect. We shall focus in particular on
multiple forms of leadership influence aimed at stimulating creativity in organizations.
Over the past 30 years, much effort has been made to analyse the differences and
similarities of different leadership styles. Many studies were devoted to transactional
and transformational leadership, or to charismatic leadership, and recently attention
has been shifted to authentic, servant and responsible leadership (Carter and Greer,
2013). Research findings have expanded and improved our understanding of the impact
that leadership style has on the results obtained by the members of an organization
and by teams. In particular, we have extended our knowledge on how leadership can
be conducive to or hinder creative behaviour. The aim of this paper is to establish in
particular how different leadership styles affect creativity in organizations. Although
classic leadership styles (e.g. task-oriented and people-oriented) remain fundamental
concepts, this study focuses on leadership styles that are of interest to contemporary
researchers.
The remaining part of the study is divided into three sections. The first outlines the
results of academic research on the impact of leadership on creativity and builds up on
the earlier review (Bratnicka, 2011). The second presents a conceptual framework capturing the current state of knowledge about interacting leadership styles, mediators and
moderators. The entire system is based on the Cartesian system of two variables: creative innovation and creative usability. The last part comprises an outline of potential
further research directions.
Overview of key studies pertaining to the role of leadership
in stimulating creativity
Puccio, Mance and Murdoch (2011) describe leadership as a factor that inspires changes,
while creativity is understood as a process leading towards change. Involvement into
creative thinking and stimulating other people’s creativity are the inalienable hallmarks
DOI: 10.7206/mba.ce.2084-3356.134
Unauthenticated
Vol. 23, No. 1/2015
Download Date | 6/23/17 6:55 PM
Relationship Between Leadership Styles and Organizational Creativity
MBA.CE
71
of leadership that leads to organizational transformation. Creative leaders stimulate
the creativity of their subordinates, use their imagination in order to provide their staff
with new directions of development and build an organizational culture that is conducive to creativity. Against this background, the issue of transformational leadership
is revealed.
Shin and Zhou (2003) undertook research aimed at establishing links between the
creativity of an individual employee and transformational leadership. It transpires
that transformational leadership has a positive impact on the creativity of an individual, whereas conservation – individual value favouring correctness and harmony
of human relations and of relations between a person and a group – reinforces this
relationship. Intrinsic …
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