1- Discussion: Reflecting on Your Writing: Scholarly VoiceAs a scholar, you want to write with objectivity and an appropriate tone. Once you have your first draft and have revised for strong paragraph development, you will want to take a further look at your writing, to ensure you are communicating in a scholarly voice. In addition, you will begin to examine how you are linking main ideas (also known as transitions).This week’s Learning Resources will help you examine your work for effective transitions and achieving scholarly voice. For this Discussion, you will reflect on your own writing in relation to scholarly voice Based on what you have learned from the week’s Learning Resources, you will share your thoughts and experiences on achieving scholarly voice. You may also choose to reflect on your practice of transitioning. To prepare for this DiscussionReview the Learning Resources on scholarly voice and transitions.Reflect on your writing process in relation to scholarly voice and transitions. You may even choose to consider how you approached this specific Assignment in relation to scholarly voice and transitions.*********Post a 1- to 2-paragraph reflection on your use of scholarly voice. (Note: You may choose to reflect specifically on how you will apply scholarly voice concepts in this week’s Assignment.) You may also choose to address your practice of applying transitions.Resources:Skarbakka, K. (2013, January 10). Steer your reader right with effective transitions [Blog post]. Retrieved from http://waldenwritingcenter.blogspot.com/2013/01/steer-your-reader-right-with-effective.htmlPrince, S. (2011, January 20). Transitioning into better writing [Blog post]. Retrieved from http://waldenwritingcenter.blogspot.com/2011/01/transitioning-into-better-writing.htmlWalden University. (2015o). Scholarly voice: Overview. Retrieved from http://academicguides.waldenu.edu/writingcenter/scholarlyvoice Read the following sections “Basics of Scholarly Voice,” “Clear and Direct Statements,” and “Discipline-Specific Expectations.”Basics of Scholarly VoiceFormal language and tone are expected in scholarly writing, although the definition of formal varies over time and by field. Most current fields agree, however, that colloquialisms, slang, contractions, biased language, rhetorical questions, and second person pronouns should be avoided.In formal writing, you must be cautious in your selection of scholarly language. Be aware that not all texts demonstrate good scholarly tone, even those that may be peer-reviewed.Watch out for these writing temptations:Using overly long or complex sentences: longer is not necessarily better. Instead, simplicity and directness should be the highest priority.Using compound sentences that try to stretch themselves too far (e.g., run-on sentences)Writing sentences that carry little information or structural purpose or those that point out the obvious.Writing in an indirect fashion to sound more scholarly or formal (e.g., using passive voice)Using “nice-sounding” words or phrases without fully understanding their specific meaning. (If you are unsure of a word’s or phrase’s definition or meaning, look it up in a dictionary or thesaurus, or find another word to use in its place.)Using unneeded words to make a point.Adding unnecessary ideas or phrases to lengthen your paragraphs and sentences.2- Assignment: Order and TransitionsHow are you linking main ideas in your writing? Might changing your paragraph’s order of content improve cohesion or flow of ideas? Are you writing in an objective, scholarly tone?For this Assignment, you will review the Learning Resources on scholarly tone and transitions. With the principle outlined in the Learning Resources in mind, try your hand at further revising your paragraph from Week 4 Assignment. You will also submit a first-draft second paragraph, focusing on a different main point from Week 2 Assignment Critical Reading and OutliningTo prepare for this AssignmentReview the Learning Resources on scholarly voice, transitions and, if necessary, the MEAL plan from Week 4.Review the content of your selected journal article.Choose another main point from Week 2 Assignment Critical Reading and Outlining.The AssignmentRevise your paragraph from Week 4’s Assignment, ensuring you are effectively linking ideas and writing in a scholarly tone.Additionally, compose a first-draft paragraph summarizing another one of the article’s main points that you identified in Week 2 Assignment Critical Reading and Outlining.*******Submit your Assignment using Walden’s APA Course Paper Template. Your submission should be 2 paragraphs long. Assignments that are submitted without using Walden’s APA Course Paper Template will not be reviewed by your Instructor.SEE THE ATTACHMENT PLEASE!!!!!!
apa_course_paper_template_6th_ed__1_.doc

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usw1_caex_6050_week05_revisingfororderandtransition.pdf

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Title of the Paper in Full Goes Here
Student Name Here
Walden University
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Abstract
Abstracts are not required for all course papers. Please ask your instructor if you have questions
regarding whether an abstract is required for a particular assignment.
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Title of the Paper in Full Goes Here
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Level 3 heading. AAA bbb cccc dddd eeee ffff gggg hhhh iiii jjjj kkkk llll mmmm nnnn
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Level 1 Heading
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References
(Please note that the following references are intended as examples only.)
Alexander, G., & Bonaparte, N. (2008). My way or the highway that I built. Ancient Dictators,
25(7), 14-31. doi:10.8220/CTCE.52.1.23-91
Babar, E. (2007). The art of being a French elephant. Adventurous Cartoon Animals, 19, 43194392. Retrieved from http://www.elephants104.ace.org
Bumstead, D. (2009). The essentials: Sandwiches and sleep. Journals of Famous Loafers, 5, 565582. doi:12.2847/CEDG.39.2.51-71
Hansel, G., & Gretel, D. (1973). Candied houses and unfriendly occupants. Thousand Oaks, CA:
Fairy Tale Publishing.
Hera, J. (2008). Why Paris was wrong. Journal of Greek Goddess Sore Spots, 20(4), 19-21. doi:
15.555/GGE.64.1.76-82
Laureate Education, Inc. (Producer). (2007). How to cite a video: The city is always Baltimore
[DVD]. Baltimore, MD: Author.
Laureate Education, Inc. (Producer). (2010). Name of program [Video webcast]. Retrieved from
http://www.courseurl.com
Sinatra, F. (2008). Zing! Went the strings of my heart. Making Good Songs Great, 18(3), 31-22.
Retrieved from http://articlesextollingrecordingsofyore.192/fs.com
Smasfaldi, H., Wareumph, I., Aeoli, Q., Rickies, F., Furoush, P., Aaegrade, V., … Fiiel, B.
(2005). The art of correcting surname mispronunciation. New York, NY: Supportive
Publisher Press. Retrieved from
http://www.onewaytociteelectronicbooksperAPA7.02.com
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White, S., & Red, R. (2001). Stop and smell the what now? Floral arranging for beginners
(Research Report No. 40-921). Retrieved from University of Wooded Glen, Center for
Aesthetic Improvements in Fairy Tales website: http://www.uwg.caift/~40_921.pdf
MEAL Plan* for
Paragraph Development
WEEK
5
M
E
A
L
Main Idea
Evidence
Analysis
Lead-Out
Your topic sentence stating the
concrete claim the paragraph is
advancing.
Paraphrase or direct quotations
from the source material you are
using to support your topic
sentence’s claim.
Your explanation and evaluation
of the evidence; explaining the
evidence you provided and its
relevance in your own words.
Concluding; preparing your
reader to transition to the next
paragraph (and the next claim).
*The MEAL plan is adapted from the Duke University Writing Studio.
See the MEAL plan in action, in this sample paragraph:
Findings [of this research study] may also inspire instructors to consider students’ preferences when
of written corrective feedback (WCF) depends in part on students’ attitudes toward the type of feedback
given. Amrhein and Nassaji also noted that students who do not think a certain type of WCF is needed
will be less likely to use it. According to Budge (2011) and Johnson and Cooke (2015), instructor feedback
plays an important role in student learning, and most students apply feedback to enhance their performance on future assignments. According to Fleming (as cited in Carless, 2006), “marking student scripts
is one of the significant quality events in the lives of students and academics” (p. 220). Korte (2015) also
noted that feedback constitutes a significant portion of an instructor’s workload. With an improved
understanding of postsecondary online students’ preferences for electronic feedback, instructors may
accommodate those preferences and thereby increase the likelihood of enhancing their students’ writing
skills, which may positively impact students’ ability to achieve their academic and professional goals.
Gredler, J. J. (2016). Postsecondary online students’ preferences for instructor
feedback (Doctoral dissertation). Retrieved from ProQuest Dissertations and
Theses Global. (Accession No. 10132030)
Tips:
Strengthen your paragraphs! Go through your own draft and
highlight each component of the MEAL plan to see what is
missing. Revise accordingly.
RESOURCE
For more resources on MEAL Plan paragraphs, go to http://waldenwritingcenter.blogspot.com/2016/11/breaking-down-meal-plan-four-part.html
© 2015 Laureate Education, Inc.
WEEK
5
REVISING FOR
ORDER AND TRANSITIONS
AS YOU REVISE YOUR WORK,
you will likely add new content, too.
Writing and revising go hand-in-hand.
It’s all progress toward your final draft!
30
30
25
20 20
20
20
15 15
10
10 10
0
2014 2015 2016
30
30
25
20 20
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15 15
10
10 10
0
2014 2015 2016
As you continue to revise your work and compose a first-draft second paragraph, focus on
the order of content presented in your paragraphs and the transitions between main ideas.
WHOLE-ESSAY
ORGANIZATION STRATEGIES
INDIVIDUAL-PARAGRAPH
ORGANIZATION STRATEGIES
READ EACH PARAGRAPH.
On note paper, write the central idea
for each paragraph, forming an outline
of your paper.
READ EACH PARAGRAPH.
Compare it to the MEAL plan
READ YOUR SUMMARIES OF EACH
CENTRAL IDEA.
Ask yourself the following:
30
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20 20
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10
10 10
0
2014 2015 2016
Does each central idea help you
support the thesis of your paper?
Do your ideas progress logically?
Main Point
Evidence
Analysis
Lead-Out
Keep referring to the
MEAL Plan as you
continue to draft and
revise your work.
IF YOU FIND ANY PARAGRAPHS THAT
DO NOT FOLLOW THE MEAL PLAN
identify which element is missing and
revise your paragraph to include this
material.
RESOURCE
For more resources on organization go to the Walden Writing Center at
http://academicguides.waldenu.edu/writingcenter/
writingprocess/effectiveorganization
Adapted from the Writing Process page from the Walden University Writing Center website.
© 2015 Laureate Education, Inc.

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