CASIMIR, Hi! Here we go!! Attached are 2 annotated bib samples they provided along with what I’ve come-up to be above the minimum requirement. You should see 26 items listed. I hope I hit the right cost amount for this too. All of these will/should tie into the upcoming papers. Thanks and standing by! Jeff
annotated_bibliography__1.docx

annotated_bibliography__2.docx

final_list_of_bibs.docx

annotated_bibliography__2.docx

final_list_of_bibs.docx

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Annotated Bibliography
A bibliography is a list of sources (books, journals, Web sites, periodicals, etc.) one has used for
researching a topic. Bibliographies are sometimes called “References” or “Works Cited”
depending on the style format you are using. A bibliography usually just includes the
bibliographic information (i.e., the author, title, publisher, etc.).
An annotation is a summary and/or evaluation. Therefore, an annotated bibliography includes
a summary and/or evaluation of each of the sources. Depending on your project or the
assignment, your annotations may do one or more of the following.



Summarize: Some annotations merely summarize the source. What are the main
arguments? What is the point of this book or article? What topics are covered? If
someone asked what this article/book is about, what would you say? The length of your
annotations will determine how detailed your summary is.
Assess: After summarizing a source, it may be helpful to evaluate it. Is it a useful source?
How does it compare with other sources in your bibliography? Is the information
reliable? Is this source biased or objective? What is the goal of this source?
Reflect: Once you’ve summarized and assessed a source, you need to ask how it fits into
your research. Was this source helpful to you? How does it help you shape your
argument? How can you use this source in your research project? Has it changed how
you think about your topic?
Your annotated bibliography may include some of these, all of these, or even others. If you’re
doing this for a class, you should get specific guidelines from your instructor.
Retrieved from: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/614/01/
Your annotations should be one brief paragraph. And all of your sources should be listed in
APA documentation style. ☺ See the following pages for examples.
Here’s how to list journal or on-line articles:
1. Bowen, G., & Martin, J. (1998). Community capacity: A core component of the 21st century
military community. Military Family Issues: The Research Digest, 2(3), 1-4. Retrieved
from https://www.jointservicessupport.org/communityforces/documents/bowen-martincommunitycapacity-component.pdf
Bowen and Martin, in their article, discuss the strengths and concerns of a strong military
community support system through the establishment of communities. Due to the many
changes in the military, there is an issue about military families receiving support within the
military community and within the community in which they live. The authors discuss the
theory of community behavior and the effects it will have on present and future military
families.
2. Fullerton, C., McCarroll, J., Feerick, M., McKibben, J., Cozza, S., & Ursano, R. (2011).
Child neglect in army families: A public health perspective. Military Medicine, 176(12),
1432-1439.
The authors are aware that the rate of child neglect in military families has increased over the
last few years, but the characteristics of this neglect have not been studied thoroughly. The
authors, to better identify strategies for interventions, investigate more about the neglect
beginning with the definition and suggesting approaches and interventions for military child
neglect.
3. Hulsey, A. (2011). Military child education coalition: Building partnerships and support
networks for military children with special needs. Exceptional Parent, 41(9), 18-20.
Retrieved from http://ehis.ebscohost.com.proxy.ohiolink.edu:9099
Hulsey reviews the support networks available to military families with special needs
children. The article looks at partnerships between schools and families and how to develop
professional development training for school personnel. Support networks are explained and
examined so the children have a smooth transition when relocating. Finally, Back to School
tips are listed to aid in school transitions for children with special needs.
4. Lowe, K., Adams, K., Browne, B., & Hinkle, K. (2012). Impact of military deployment on
family relationships. Journal of Family Studies, 18(1), 17-27.
The authors, in their study, investigate the effect of a service member’s deployment on the
family, especially the children. They look at how the child-parent relationship is adversely
affected by deployment. This article will benefit mental health care professionals and
educators as they interact with military families through times of transition.
5. Schuchs-Gopcrul, E. (2011). Legal issues facing military families with special needs
children. Reporter, 38(1), 20-27. Retrieved from
http://www.wrightslaw.com/info/mil.parents.12things.pdf
This article reviews twelve items that every parent, especially military parents, who have a
child with a special need must read. The Individuals with Disabilities Education
Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA), a mainstay of special education, was referenced in many
of the twelve suggestions. The advice given in the article is relevant and useful for parents in
their search for free and appropriate education for their children with special needs.
Here’s how to list book references
1. Anthony, R., Hawkins, D., & Merchant, K. (2003). Accounting: text and cases (11th ed.).
Boston, MA: McGraw-Hill.
This text covers financial and managerial accounting concepts and includes 120 case studies
for concept application. The case studies that were used focused on Higher Education and
built a foundation of knowledge for ethical and sustainable fiscal management.
2. Brinckerhoff, P.C. (2003). Mission-Based Marketing (2nd ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John
Wiley & Sons.
Brinckerhoff focused on non-profit specific marketing strategies and emphasized the
importance of aligning the organization’s mission with its marketing campaign. This is
critical information, particularly for tuition driven institutions, as competition has become
fiercer in the struggling economy of today.
3. Cohen, A. M., & Brawer, F. B. (2003). The American community college (4th ed.). San
Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
A primary resource for community college boards, faculty, and administrators. It provides
insight into how the community college fits into the American educational system, how the
community college landscape has shifted, and the responsibility and effect they have on our
society and communities.
4. Cohen, A. M., Brawer, F. B., & Associates. (1994). Managing community colleges. San
Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Inc.
Managing Community Colleges is a practical and invaluable resource that provides theories
and concepts specific to community colleges. Experts from a variety of areas within the
community college system provide personal experiences, new ideas, and approaches to
successfully managing community colleges proactively.
5. Coghlan, D., & Brannick. T. (2001). Doing Research in your own organization. London,
UK: Sage.
Coghlan and Brannick examine the benefits of embarking on action research within
institutuions, and provides both valuable insights and common pitfalls. Gaining this type of
data and insight into our own institutions is critical to our goal of data driven decision
making and goal setting.
Annotated Bibliography
1.
Abrams, N. E., & Primack, J. R. (2011). The New Universe and the Human Future: How
a Shared Cosmology Could Transform the World. New Haven, CT: Yale University
Press.
In this book, the authors explain how science and cosmology can provide us with
a new understanding of our future and what a new origin story would mean for us.
Giving in-depth information about the universe and its history, Abrams and
Primack describe how we have come to know ourselves as human with so many
different ties to philosophy and religion. They use the universe as a literal and
metaphorical example of how to exist in an interdependent system with other
modes of energy. The authors explain how we can use our collective knowledge
of past and present to design a new origin story; a story that provides purpose of
life both spiritually and philosophically which can be lived by for generations.
2.
Adams, C. (Ed.). (1996). The Soul Unearthed: Celebrating Wildness and Personal
Renewal Through Nature. New York, NY: Putnam.
The Soul Unearthed is a collection of essays about the joy, serenity, and pure ease
that comes from the wilderness or simply being outside. These authors have
come to share their experiences on long hiking trips, rites of passage quests, and
in a small part of the world that they can call their own. They tell of how being at
one with the land fills many parts of their soul with happiness, appreciation, and
calm. In particular, Adams depicts the profound experiences of nature-based
healing and how it can occur. This book proves the power of being at one with
nature.
3.
Arrien, A. (1993). The Four-Fold Way: Walking the Paths of the Warrior, Teacher,
Healer, and Visionary. San Francisco, CA: HarperCollins.
Arrien explains what it means to walk the paths of the Warrior, Teacher, Healer,
and Visionary. Using traditional fundamentals, she provides multi cultural
descriptions of each path as well as a list of characteristics that each possess. She
examines the medicine wheel of the Native Americans, the six directions, and
prayers that recognize them. Arrien explores various spiritualties, their traditions,
and ceremonies while suggesting questions regarding each path as well as
meditation exercises that might be useful.
4.
Ashley, P. (2007). Toward an Understanding and Definition of Wilderness Spirituality.
Australian Geographer, 38(1), 53-69.
Ashley examines wilderness spirituality and nature-based spirituality in this
article. Wilderness spirituality, he says, has numerous meanings for various
people across the world and through time, which leaves the concept vague for
those recently introduced. Because of this, a sample of the general population
(2X) and a group of experts (X) were surveyed by associated words, phrases, and
feelings with their experience with the spiritual side of the wilderness. The
aboriginal culture of the Tasmanian was an example that Ashley provided of
traditional wilderness spirituality, and our interconnectedness with nature. He
shows how nature and the wilderness offer people a sense of meaning and
connection with spirit, each other, and their place in the web of life.
5.
Beitmann, J. (2011). Who Are They? A Descriptive Study of Adolescents in Wilderness
and Residential Programs. Residential Treatment for Children and Youth, 28, 192-210.
In this article, the authors investigate the youth demographic, utilizing such
programs as residential and wilderness therapy. According to these authors, all of
these youth share common characteristics. Using psychological evaluations they
[these authors] found that percentages of these youth have engaged in selfharming behaviors; violence; substance use and abuse; criminal behaviors which
resulted in arrests; recently experienced a traumatic event; are currently on
medications for depression, ADHD symptoms, bipolar disorder and
antipsychotics. The authors maintain that these adolescents also exhibited higher
than average intelligence and academic achievement.
6.
Berry, T. (1988). The Dream of the Earth. San Francisco, CA: Sierra Club Books.
This book contains a collection of essays written by Thomas Berry explaining the
current state of the planet and the role we, as humans, play in it. He describes the
physical effects of pollution and overpopulation on the earth’s natural resources,
and our internalized effects of consumerism and technology addiction. Berry also
explains the industrial era’s profound influence on our progress as a civilization as
providers and consumers. It is this learned overconsumption he says that has
caused adverse effects on our planet as well as our psyches. He offers an
enlightened perspective on how to transform this unsustainable way of life to one
that is organic, connected with the rest of the universe, and has less impact on the
environment. Berry’s essays provide a formula for environmental change, which
should be utilized by everyone so that we can reconnect to our true roots as
species interconnected with the rest of existence.
7.
Capra, F. (1996). The Web of Life: A New Scientific Understanding of Living Systems.
New York, NY: Anchor Books.
In The Web of Life, Capra illustrates the patterns and construction of living and
nonliving complex systems through dialogue, historical evolution, and scientific
examples. He places great emphasis on the complex parts of the whole system
because of their interdependence on each other, their interconnections. The whole
is greater than the sum of its parts and it is the whole that decides the action of the
parts. Understanding the system as a whole as well as the individual parts and
properties that make the system is the purpose of this book. Using Systems
Theories, Chaos Theory, Gaia Theory, and many others, Capra explains all forms
of complex systems such as ecosystems and social systems.
8.
Buzzell, L., & Chalquist, C. (Eds.). (2009). Ecotherapy: Healing With Nature in Mind.
San Francisco, CA: Sierra Club Books.
This book is a collection of essays that looks at all forms of Ecotherapy, or applied
Ecopsychology. The authors range from Theodore Roszak to Robert Greenway and they
all explain how to incorporate nature into psychological healing by way of integrating it
physically into a person’s life. The authors unveil the various methods being employed
out there in the world by reading the different articles, understanding where these
professionals have found the place that grounds and centers them, and by witnessing the
many different careers available in this field.
9.
Collins, M. (2010). Spiritual Intelligence: Evolving Transpersonal Potential Toward
Ecological Actualization For a Sustainable Future. World Futures, 66, 320-334.
This article explains the self-destruction that we, as a society have brought upon
the earth and all of its inhabitants, while also explaining how we might overcome
that destruction. Collins tells us that we need evaluate ourselves from a personal
to a transpersonal level of thinking and feeling, so that we may actualize our full
potential as individuals and as a society. His main argument is that we need to
change our self-destructive behaviors in order to realize a state of harmony
amongst ourselves and nature (nonduality), this he expresses through the
“development of intelligences”, aka, actualizations. Collins also speaks a great
deal about the Akashic Field as formulated by Ervin Laszlo, which provides a
transpersonal perspective on how to transcend this self-destructive thinking.
10.
Corral-Verduga, V. (2011). Happiness as a Correlate of Sustainable Behavior: A Study of
Pro-Ecological, Frugal, Equitable and Altruistic Actions that Promote Subjective WellBeing. Human Ecology Review, 2(18), 95-104.
The authors of this article explain that humans who view the world from an
anthropocentric perspective behave in ways that are detrimental to the planet and
its inhabitants. These behaviors, they say, include such things as consumerism,
globalization, waste (i.e., food, garbage, recycling), pollution, and contamination.
However, people who practice sustainable living behaviors such as being frugal,
or in other words, maximizing what they already have in terms of food, clothing,
and other materialistic goods; altruism, which is engaging in behaviors for the
benefit of someone else; and equitability, which is to view, treat, and share all
resources with the community equally without bias regardless of demographic,
race, age, etc.
11.
Cortright, B. (1997). Psychotherapy and Spirit: Theory and Practice in Transpersonal
Psychotherapy. Albany, NY: SUNY Press.
In this book, Cortright examines the history and conception of Transpersonal
Psychotherapy. He explains that by asking the question, “Who am I?” we are
confronted with two different answers: an ancient spiritual answer, which is “I am
a spirit, a soul”, and a modern answer, which is “I am a self, an ego”.
Transpersonal psychotherapy, he says, is the integration and psychotherapeutic
practice of these two modes of thought. The importance of consciousness, in all
states, is explored while Cortright introduces and describes the approaches of Ken
Wilber, Carl Jung, Hameed Ali, Roberto Assagioli, and Stanislav Grof.
12.
Davis, J. (2000). We Keep Asking Ourselves, What is Transpersonal Psychology?
Guidance and Counseling, 15(3), 3-8.
In this article, Davis introduces Transpersonal Psychology, what it is and what its
relationship to spirituality is. Davis speaks of the main theme being nonduality
and how that is also used in other cultures’ spirituality. He also provides an
overview disclosing information about the “grandfathers” James, Grof, Jung, etc.
as well as transpersonal psychology’s practical methods, which are applied in
Transpersonal Psychotherapy.
13.
Davis, J. (1998). The Transpersonal Dimensions of Ecopsychology: Nature, Nonduality,
and Spiritual Practice. The Humanistic Psychologist, 26(1-3), 60-100.
Davis reviews ecopsychology, using his novel description, definition, and
summary of “nonduality”. His explanation is that nonduality is essentially when
the separation from Self and Nature occurs, or when the great Mystery no longer
exists. Nonduality, though an original term, is a fairly well-known concept, at
least in this field; the notion that human beings are no different/separate from the
earth than other flora and fauna and that breaking that connection will generate
severe issues within the community is the foundation of ecopsychology. Davis
puts great emphasis on the human condition and how it perpetuates nondual
destruction by widening the separation gap between human beings, the earth, and
one another. Nonduality, he says, is the act of re-establishing the lost or severed
relationship we once had to nature, the understanding that we are nature.
14.
Davis, J. V. (2011). Ecopsychology, Transpersonal Psychology, and Nonduality.
International Journal of Transpersonal Studies, 30(1-2), 137-147.
Davis states that the human-nature relationship is the foundation of all our
negative and positive experiences and consequences. He goes on to say that,
viewing ourselves as separate from nature and behaving in concordance with that
perspective with such actions of forest degradation, overconsumption of natural
resources, tearing down parks and fields, etc. is the cause of humanity’s suffering
as a whole. To accept this human-nature relationship and take responsibility for
our part in it, explains Davis, will heal both humans and the planet. What Davis is
interested in, in this article is how self-identification means viewing the human
species in relation to its place in nature, and the universe and nonhuman world as
a whole. Indeed, self-identifying with nature as home and self and behaving
accordingly free from self-interest and separateness is what Davis has termed
“nonduality”.
15.
Davis, K. M. (2009). Ecotherapy: Tribalism in the Mountains and Forest. Journal of
Creativity in Mental Health, 4, 273-282.
In this article, Davis focuses on ecotherapy, which is the application of
ecopsychology into therapeutic practice. The main premise he makes is that
humans are not separate from the rest of the earth. Humans, animals, plants,
natural resources, and the rest of the universe are all interrelated; all threads in the
same web of life, if you will. He says that when one part of the web is damaged or
negatively affected, such as the earth’s natural environments, everything else in
the web is affected, too. Davis maintains that we are connected to the earth
psychologically, spiritually, and emotionally so we need to treat the earth and all
its inhabitants as part of us, our family in order to bring about true healthy living.
16.
Davis-Berman, J., & Berman, D. (2008). The Promise of Wilderness Therapy. Boulder,
CO: Association f …
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