Be sure to directly show how what you say does or does not support the thesis/conclusion. Make the case for your assessment by doing an evaluation of how well the author has supported or not what they set out to do. Make sure this is very clear.
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Think Pieces
Dr. Dubrofsky
E-mail: rdubrofsky@usf.edu
Due Dates
Assignments must be submitted on Canvas by the day and time listed on Canvas. NO submissions will be
accepted after the deadline.
Goal
Completing this assignment helps you understand what you are reading, helps you slow down to pay
attention, and prepares you for a productive class discussion about the material.
What to do
1. Pick out the thesis statement from the reading: This is the argument the author(s) wants to make, the
reason for the work. Quote it. This should look something like this: “The article will make the
argument that the television show Pee-wee’s Big Adventure affirms notions of white masculinity
while presenting itself as progressive and advocating for diversity” (p. 2). Next, in a few sentences,
assess whether the author carried through on showing their thesis in the reading, and how well they
did this. Support what you say with evidence—evidence is when you draw from the reading directly
to show where they did or did not support their thesis.
2. Pick out the main conclusions in the reading. These are often related to the thesis statement. You
can put these in your own words, or pick a short quote in the reading that summarizes these. In a
few sentences, evaluate whether the author actually showed/established these things in the body of
the reading, and how well they did this. Provide evidence for your assessment. Again, remember,
evidence is when you draw from the reading directly to show where the conclusions were or were
not supported.
3. Pick a quote you find interesting and thought provoking in terms of what it can help you see and
think about in relation to critical issues in the media. Critical issues are when we think about
inequality, power, oppression and privilege, usually in relation to things like race, gender, sexuality,
class, ability, religion, national identity, for instance. The quote should be 2-5 sentences. Be sure to
use quotation marks when quoting, and include the page number in parenthesis next to it (see
example in item #1). Immediately after the quote, put into your own words what the quote says.
This should be several sentences explaining the meaning of the quote. Then, importantly, discuss
why the quote is interesting in terms of helping us gain insight about critical issues in the media.
Grading: Complete/Incomplete
You will receive an automatic incomplete/fail (a zero) if:
1- The writing is not coherent, clear, grammatical and organized: I need to clearly understand what
you are saying.
2- If the work does not show an understanding of the main ideas (thesis, conclusions) in the reading
3- Assessments about the thesis is not clear and supported
4- Assessments about the conclusion is not clear and supported
5- There is no assessment of media in relation to the quote
6- There is no assessment of critical issues in relation to the quote
7- Comments about media and critical issues are not directly related to the quote
8- Instructor feedback on previous work was not followed here: Take into account all previous
feedback received
In addition to satisfying the above eight minimum requirements, a complete is normally granted for
satisfying a combination of a minimum of 2 of the 5 items listed below:
– Offering thoughtful insights about critical issues using the quote
– Offering thoughtful insights about media using the quote
– Offering an insightful assessment of how well the author showed their thesis
– Offering an insightful assessment of how well the author supported their conclusions
– Showing an excellent grasp of the main ideas in the reading in your discussion of some or all of:
the thesis, conclusion, quote
Format & Length
Assignments are one page single-spaced, typed, and printed in a reasonably sized 12-point font (Times
New Roman is a good font) with one-inch margins.
The minimum requirement is 500 words. You can write more. Less than 500 words will result in an
automatic incomplete (0). The 500-word count EXCLUDES identifying information/prefatory
information: Do not include your name, the title of the assignment, date etc. This info automatically
provided on the Canvas tab when you submit the work.
All work must be submitted online on Canvas as a Word document (.doc or .docx)—other formats usually
do not work on Canvas. Paper and email submissions will not be accepted.
The writing must be in academic essay style, full sentences, grammatical, free of spelling errors, well
organized and clear.
Turnitin
All assignments submitted through Canvas will automatically be run through a plagiarism detection
service called Turnitin. In cases of plagiarism, the instructor receives a report showing exactly how a
student’s paper was plagiarized). For information on Turnitin, please go to
http://turnitin.com/en_us/features/originalitycheck
Citing Sources
If you cite sources not assigned in class, you must use MLA or APA format (research this). You will receive
an incomplete if you do not cite properly since this can be considered plagiarism.
If you cite sources assigned in class, simply include quotations marks around the quote, and the page number
in parenthesis next to the quote. See quote in item 1 above under “What to do” for how this should look.
Here are links with info on MLA & APA formats:
 MLA: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/
 APA: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/
2
Think Pieces
Dr. Dubrofsky
E-mail: rdubrofsky@usf.edu
Due Dates
Assignments must be submitted on Canvas by the day and time listed on Canvas. NO submissions will be
accepted after the deadline.
Goal
Completing this assignment helps you understand what you are reading, helps you slow down to pay
attention, and prepares you for a productive class discussion about the material.
What to do
1. Pick out the thesis statement from the reading: This is the argument the author(s) wants to make, the
reason for the work. Quote it. This should look something like this: “The article will make the
argument that the television show Pee-wee’s Big Adventure affirms notions of white masculinity
while presenting itself as progressive and advocating for diversity” (p. 2). Next, in a few sentences,
assess whether the author carried through on showing their thesis in the reading, and how well they
did this. Support what you say with evidence—evidence is when you draw from the reading directly
to show where they did or did not support their thesis.
2. Pick out the main conclusions in the reading. These are often related to the thesis statement. You
can put these in your own words, or pick a short quote in the reading that summarizes these. In a
few sentences, evaluate whether the author actually showed/established these things in the body of
the reading, and how well they did this. Provide evidence for your assessment. Again, remember,
evidence is when you draw from the reading directly to show where the conclusions were or were
not supported.
3. Pick a quote you find interesting and thought provoking in terms of what it can help you see and
think about in relation to critical issues in the media. Critical issues are when we think about
inequality, power, oppression and privilege, usually in relation to things like race, gender, sexuality,
class, ability, religion, national identity, for instance. The quote should be 2-5 sentences. Be sure to
use quotation marks when quoting, and include the page number in parenthesis next to it (see
example in item #1). Immediately after the quote, put into your own words what the quote says.
This should be several sentences explaining the meaning of the quote. Then, importantly, discuss
why the quote is interesting in terms of helping us gain insight about critical issues in the media.
Grading: Complete/Incomplete
You will receive an automatic incomplete/fail (a zero) if:
1- The writing is not coherent, clear, grammatical and organized: I need to clearly understand what
you are saying.
2- If the work does not show an understanding of the main ideas (thesis, conclusions) in the reading
3- Assessments about the thesis is not clear and supported
4- Assessments about the conclusion is not clear and supported
5- There is no assessment of media in relation to the quote
6- There is no assessment of critical issues in relation to the quote
7- Comments about media and critical issues are not directly related to the quote
8- Instructor feedback on previous work was not followed here: Take into account all previous
feedback received
In addition to satisfying the above eight minimum requirements, a complete is normally granted for
satisfying a combination of a minimum of 2 of the 5 items listed below:
– Offering thoughtful insights about critical issues using the quote
– Offering thoughtful insights about media using the quote
– Offering an insightful assessment of how well the author showed their thesis
– Offering an insightful assessment of how well the author supported their conclusions
– Showing an excellent grasp of the main ideas in the reading in your discussion of some or all of:
the thesis, conclusion, quote
Format & Length
Assignments are one page single-spaced, typed, and printed in a reasonably sized 12-point font (Times
New Roman is a good font) with one-inch margins.
The minimum requirement is 500 words. You can write more. Less than 500 words will result in an
automatic incomplete (0). The 500-word count EXCLUDES identifying information/prefatory
information: Do not include your name, the title of the assignment, date etc. This info automatically
provided on the Canvas tab when you submit the work.
All work must be submitted online on Canvas as a Word document (.doc or .docx)—other formats usually
do not work on Canvas. Paper and email submissions will not be accepted.
The writing must be in academic essay style, full sentences, grammatical, free of spelling errors, well
organized and clear.
Turnitin
All assignments submitted through Canvas will automatically be run through a plagiarism detection
service called Turnitin. In cases of plagiarism, the instructor receives a report showing exactly how a
student’s paper was plagiarized). For information on Turnitin, please go to
http://turnitin.com/en_us/features/originalitycheck
Citing Sources
If you cite sources not assigned in class, you must use MLA or APA format (research this). You will receive
an incomplete if you do not cite properly since this can be considered plagiarism.
If you cite sources assigned in class, simply include quotations marks around the quote, and the page number
in parenthesis next to the quote. See quote in item 1 above under “What to do” for how this should look.
Here are links with info on MLA & APA formats:
 MLA: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/
 APA: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/
2
Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies
ISSN: 1479-1420 (Print) 1479-4233 (Online) Journal homepage: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/rccc20
Cultural studies, public pedagogy, and the
responsibility of intellectuals
Henry A. Giroux
To cite this article: Henry A. Giroux (2004) Cultural studies, public pedagogy, and the
responsibility of intellectuals, Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies, 1:1, 59-79, DOI:
10.1080/1479142042000180926
To link to this article: https://doi.org/10.1080/1479142042000180926
Published online: 06 Aug 2006.
Submit your article to this journal
Article views: 2515
Citing articles: 126 View citing articles
Full Terms & Conditions of access and use can be found at
http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=rccc20
Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies
Vol. 1, No. 1, March 2004, pp. 59–79
Cultural Studies, Public Pedagogy,
and the Responsibility of Intellectuals
Henry A. Giroux
H.A.GirouxSecondary Education and Cultural StudiesPenn State University217 Chambers Bldg, University ParkPA 16802USAhag5@psu.edu
Cultural studies seems to have passed into the shadows of academic interests, replaced
by globalization and political economy as the new millennium’s privileged concerns
among left academics. Yet, cultural studies’ longstanding interest in the interrelationship
of power, politics, and culture remains critically important. Matters of agency, consciousness, pedagogy, and rhetoric are central to any public discourse about politics, not to
mention education itself. Hence, this article argues that the promise of cultural studies,
especially as a fundamental aspect of higher education, resides in a larger transformative
and democratic politics in which matters of pedagogy and agency play a central role.
Keywords: Pedagogy; Cultural Studies; Agency; Culture; Politics
Within the last few decades, a number of critical and cultural studies theorists such
as Stuart Hall, Lawrence Grossberg, Douglas Kellner, Meghan Morris, Toby Miller,
and Tony Bennett have provided valuable contributions to our understanding of
how culture deploys power and is shaped and organized within diverse systems of
representation, production, consumption, and distribution. Particularly important
to such work is an ongoing critical analysis of how symbolic and institutional forms
of culture and power are mutually entangled in constructing diverse identities,
modes of political agency, and the social world itself. Within this approach, material
relations of power and the production of social meaning do not cancel each other
out but constitute the precondition for all meaningful practices. Culture is recognized as the social field where goods and social practices are not only produced,
distributed, and consumed but also invested with various meanings and ideologies
implicated in the generation of political effects. Culture is partly defined as a circuit
of power, ideologies, and values in which diverse images and sounds are produced
and circulated, identities are constructed, inhabited, and discarded, agency is maniHenry A. Giroux is the Waterbury Chair Professor of Secondary Education and Cultural Studies at Penn State
University. He is also the Director of the Waterbury Forum for Education and Cultural Studies. Correspondence to: Henry Giroux, 217 Chambers Bldg, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA. Email:
hag5@psu.edu
ISSN 1479-1420 (print)/ISSN 1479-4233 (online)  2004 National Communication Association
DOI: 10.1080/1479142042000180935
60
H. A. Giroux
fested in both individualized and social forms, and discourses are created, which
make culture itself the object of inquiry and critical analyses. Rather than being
viewed as a static force, the substance of culture and everyday life—knowledge,
goods, social practices, and contexts—repeatedly mutates and is subject to ongoing
changes and interpretations.
Following the work of Antonio Gramsci and Stuart Hall, many cultural theorists
acknowledge the primacy of culture’s role as an educational site where identities are
being continually transformed, power is enacted, and learning assumes a political
dynamic as it becomes not only the condition for the acquisition of agency but also
the sphere for imagining oppositional social change. As a space for both the
production of meaning and social interaction, culture is viewed by many contemporary theorists as an important terrain in which various modes of agency, identity, and
values are neither prefigured nor always in place but subject to negotiation and
struggle, and open for creating new democratic transformations, though always
within various degrees of iniquitous power relations. Rather than being dismissed as
a reflection of larger economic forces or as simply the “common ground” of
everyday life, culture is recognized by many advocates of cultural studies as both a
site of contestation and a site of utopian possibility, a space in which an emancipating politics can be fashioned that “consists in making seem possible precisely that
which, from within the situation, is declared to be impossible.”1
Cultural studies theorists have greatly expanded our theoretical understanding of
the ideological, institutional, and performative workings of culture, but as important
as this work might be, it does not go far enough—though there are some exceptions
as in the work of Stanley Aronowitz, bell hooks, and Nick Couldry—in connecting
the most critical insights of cultural studies with an understanding of the importance
of critical pedagogy, particularly as part of a larger project for expanding the
possibilities of a democratic politics, the dynamics of resistance, and the capacities
for social agency. For too many theorists, pedagogy often occupies a limited role
theoretically and politically in configuring cultural studies as a form of cultural
politics.2 While many cultural studies advocates recognize the political importance of
pedagogy, it is often acknowledged in a very limited and narrow way. For instance,
when invoked as an important political practice, pedagogy is either limited to the
role that oppositional intellectuals might play within academia or reduced almost
entirely to forms of learning that take place in schools. Even when pedagogy is
related to issues of democracy, citizenship, and the struggle over the shaping of
identities and identifications, it is rarely taken up as part of a broader public
politics—as part of a larger attempt to explain how learning takes place outside of
schools or what it means to assess the political significance of understanding the
broader educational force of culture in the new age of media technology, multimedia, and computer-based information and communication networks. Put differently,
pedagogy is limited to what goes on in schools, and the role of cultural studies
theorists who address pedagogical concerns is largely reduced to teaching cultural
studies within the classroom.
Within this discourse, cultural studies becomes available as a resource to educators
Cultural studies, pedagogy, and responsibility
61
who can then teach students how to look at the media (industry and texts), analyze
audience reception, challenge rigid disciplinary boundaries, critically engage popular
culture, produce critical knowledge, or use cultural studies to reform the curricula
and challenge disciplinary formations within public schools and higher education.
For instance, Shane Gunster has argued that the main contribution cultural studies
makes to pedagogy “is the insistence that any kind of critical education must be
rooted in the culture, experience, and knowledge that students bring to the classroom.”3 While this is an important insight, it has been argued in enormously
sophisticated ways for over fifty years by a host of progressive educators, including
John Dewey, Maxine Greene, and Paulo Freire. The problem lies not in Gunster’s
unfamiliarity with such scholarship but in his willingness to repeat the presupposition that the classroom is the exclusive site in which pedagogy becomes a relevant
object of analysis. If he had crossed the very disciplinary boundaries he decries in his
celebration of cultural studies, he would have found that educational theorists such
as Roger Simon, David Trend, and others have expanded the meaning of pedagogy
as a political and moral practice and extended its application far beyond the
classroom while also attempting to combine the cultural and the pedagogical as part
of a broader notion of political education and cultural studies.4
Many cultural studies theorists, such as Lawrence Grossberg, have rightly suggested that cultural studies has an important role to play in helping educators
rethink, among other things, the nature of pedagogy and knowledge, the purpose of
schooling, and the impact of larger social forces on schools.5 And, surely, Gunster
takes such advice seriously but fails to understand its limits and in doing so repeats
a now familiar refrain among critical educational theorists about connecting peda …
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